Presidents' Panel: A Conversation with I. King Jordan, Robert Davila, and T. Alan Hurwitz

By Greenwald, Brian H. | Sign Language Studies, Fall 2014 | Go to article overview

Presidents' Panel: A Conversation with I. King Jordan, Robert Davila, and T. Alan Hurwitz


Greenwald, Brian H., Sign Language Studies


Dr. I. King Jordan, eighth president (Jordan)

Dr. Robert Davila, ninth president (Davila)

Dr. T. Alan Hurwitz, tenth president (Hurwitz)

Dr. Brian H. Greenwald, moderator (Greenwald)

GREENWALD: First, I would like to begin with Dr. Davila and Dr. Jordan. We'll get back to you, President Hurwitz, in just a moment. Perhaps you can explain what you have been doing since you left the university and went into retirement. Dr. Davila?

DAVILA: First, it required two years to finally accept the fact that I was not going to any office in the morning. I worked for fifty-seven years.The adjustment required some time. But I did change, and I really am enjoying my retirement now. I have time for my family, which in the past I did not have. I talk to friends more now.They have called in the past, but I've always just had short business relationships and talked briefly with them. Now I spend time speaking to them. I'm working on a book about multicultural issues related to Spanish children. I'm working with three or four other individuals on this book, so that's taking up my time. I'm writing letters of recommendation for individuals looking for jobs. I am still busy but enjoying my retirement very much.

GREENWALD: Thank you. Dr. Jordan?

JORDAN: Interestingly, I'm still in my office every day. I became something of a spokesperson for the rights and abilities of people who are deaf and people who are disabled when I was appointed president.The way I became president was so public and so much attention was given to it that I was thrust into the role of speaking for the rights of people who were deaf and disabled. It's like I had two jobs. I was CEO of Gallaudet University as president of Gallaudet, but I was also an advocate. When I stepped down as president, I became a full-time advocate.That's what I do. I go to my office. I speak. I'm on boards. I am on six boards, including one corporate board. I think I am still the only deaf corporate director in the United States, and it's really an honor. I've spent a lot of time still studying and doing research on deaf issues. I published a really interesting and well-received paper with Janet Pray, a woman in the Department of Social Work for many years and recently retired. I don't think my wife would let me stay home. She insists I go to my office. I really enjoy what I'm doing.

GREENWALD: President Hurwitz, can you tell us your plans for the next few years?

HURWITZ: What I have planned for the next few years? Well, I think I plan to be here for a while. I'm now in my fourth year, and I have to wonder where the time went. Everything has happened so quickly, and it's been just an amazing experience. Over the next few years I plan to continue to be here in this capacity.

GREENWALD: What are your plans for Gallaudet University?

HURWITZ:Well, we have a strategic plan that was approved by the Board of Trustees, and we are now currently in the middle of that five-year strategic plan. We are now going through an evaluation phase to see how well we have done in the past several years. We also have a number of activities that require continuous attention. One exciting thing I wanted to mention is that we have just established a ten-year campus-improvement plan that was recently approved by the DC zoning board last week. That will keep us busy. I plan to be involved with fund-raising efforts, meet with members of Congress, and continue to seek support that we need so that we can provide the necessary support for our students. Those are my plans for the next couple of years.

GREENWALD: When DPN occurred in 1988,1 think most obviously for you, Dr. Jordan, I would like to know where the two of you [Dr. Davila and Dr. Hurwitz] were when DPN occurred. Dr. Davila?

DAVILA: I was living on campus. I was here. I was living behind MSSD [Model Secondary School for the Deaf] at the time. When DPN started, the board established a management committee made of up of the provost, the vice president of business, myself, and Merv Garretson, who was special assistant to the president. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Presidents' Panel: A Conversation with I. King Jordan, Robert Davila, and T. Alan Hurwitz
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.