Editor's Note

By Babbili, Anantha S. | Journalism and Communication Monographs, Spring 2003 | Go to article overview

Editor's Note


Babbili, Anantha S., Journalism and Communication Monographs


With this issue we begin another year of the Journalism & Communication Monographs.

Publication of each Monograph rests solely on timely and insightful critiques completed by a wide variety of scholars. Every manuscript goes through intense scrutiny by specialists from a particular area of inquiry within the field. In case of mixed reviews on a given manuscript, an additional reviewer is selected to break the tie in recommendation for publication.

The Monograph submissions are longer in length and they call for a sustained interest and attention of the reviewer. This editorial process is time-consuming. I am deeply grateful to those who review these manuscripts willingly and conscientiously. The particular comments and suggestions they make on each manuscript are helpful to the authors regardless of the outcome of its publication.

We will continue to publish a wide variety of content that embraces the sheer diversity of interests within the AEJMC and of the wider body of scholarship.

I, the editorial staff of the Monographs, and the AEJMC Publications Committee express deep gratitude to the following reviewers:

David Allen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Michael Alleyne, Middle Tennessee State University; Kay Amert, University of Iowa; Julie Andsager, Washington State University; Robert K. Avery, University of Utah; Sandra Brahman, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Kevin Barnhurst, University of Illinois-Chicago; Benjamin Bates, University of Tennessee; Daniel Berkowitz, University of Iowa; Elizabeth Bird, University of South Florida; Bonnie Brennan, University of Missouri; Cindy Brown, University of Southern Mississippi; Chris Campbell, University of Idaho; Richard Campbell, Middle Tennessee State University; Tsan-Kuo Chang, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Anne Cooper-Chen, Ohio University; Roger Cooper, Texas Christian University; Deni Elliot, University of Montana; Ana Garner, Marquette University; Carol Glynn, Ohio State University; Douglas Gomery, University of Maryland; Herman Gray, University of California-Santa Cruz; Michael Gurevitch, University of Maryland; Chris Harris, Middle Tennessee State University; Harry W. …

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