Court Nixes Passenger Lawsuit against Greyhound, Cops for Deadly Crash

By Perkel, Colin | The Canadian Press, January 8, 2015 | Go to article overview

Court Nixes Passenger Lawsuit against Greyhound, Cops for Deadly Crash


Perkel, Colin, The Canadian Press


Suit against Greyhound for deadly crash nixed

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TORONTO - A group of passengers have failed in their bid to sue Greyhound and the driver of a bus involved in a deadly crash in northern Ontario caused by an unstable man who suddenly grabbed the wheel.

In upholding a lower court decision on Thursday, Ontario's top court found no problems with what the trial judge had done.

"The key issues involved the standard of care to be observed by police officers and by a bus driver," the Appeal Court said in its judgment.

"The trial judge was uniquely positioned to decide whether he needed expert evidence to determine those standards of care and his rulings attract deference."

The case arose in December 2000, when Shaun Davis, 21, travelling from Calgary, boarded a Greyhound in Ignace, Ont., en route to a Christmas family gathering in Pictou, N.S.

Police in the hamlet investigated after Davis told the driver that some passengers had been going through his baggage and that people were after him or wanted to beat him up, court documents show.

However, he also said he did not want to see a doctor and just wanted to get home.

The officers concluded Davis, although anxious and mildly paranoid, had committed no crime, seemed calm, well-mannered, and rational. They allowed him to board after assuring driver Albert Dolph that he posed no threat.

About an hour later, Dolph asked Davis to leave the stairwell and return to his seat. Instead, Davis lunged at Dolph and grabbed the wheel, prompting the bus and its 32 passengers to veer off the road between Kenora and Thunder Bay and flip. …

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