Toward Our Mutual Flourishing: The Episcopal Church, Interreligious Relations, and Theologies of Manyness

By Kujawa-Holbrook, Sheryl A. | Anglican and Episcopal History, December 2014 | Go to article overview

Toward Our Mutual Flourishing: The Episcopal Church, Interreligious Relations, and Theologies of Manyness


Kujawa-Holbrook, Sheryl A., Anglican and Episcopal History


Toward Our Mutual Flourishing: The Episcopal Church, Interreligious Relations, and Theologies of Manyness. By Lucinda Allen Mosher. Studies in Episcopal and Anglican Theology, volume .3. (New York: Peter Lang, 2012, Pp. xiii, 189. $79.95.)

This volume by scholar and consultant Lucinda Allen Mosher on the history and development of interreligious relationships in the Episcopal Church is an important resource for historians and religious leaders interested in the church's encounters with other religious groups. One of the most important aspects of the book is its particular focus on ecumenism and the interfaith movement from the perspective of the teachings and experience of the Episcopal Church, where relatively few studies exist, a book in the same series by Frederick Quinn, Welcoming the Interfaith Future (2012) a notable exception. Mosher's many years of experience in the interfaith movement, her previous writing and scholarship, as well as her leadership within theological education, all contribute to the comprehensiveness, and the accessibility, of this fine work.

Toward Our Mutual Flourishing begins with a discussion of the sources used by the author to capture the interfaith movement from an insider's perspective, including actions of the General Convention and Executive Council, pastoral letters, sermons and addresses by presiding bishops, actions of standing commissions and task forces, and the teachings of the Lambeth Conference. Because of the many levels within Episcopal Church polity where interreligious engagement and collaboration take place, it is necessary to examine a wide variety of sources. Mosher argues that since the 1970s, as the Episcopal Church's teaching on "manyness," a term borrowed from historian Catherine Albanese referring to the diversity of religious traditions not only existing but flourishing together, has developed through a number of significant and overlapping themes. These themes are then explained throughout the chapters of the book.

Chapter 1 focuses on the Episcopal Church's adoption of its first major interfaith statement, Principles for Interfaith Dialogue (1994), which lays out a theology of religious manyness, as well as a rationale for engagement across religious groups. Chapter 2 traces the Episcopal Church's preference for conducting interreligious engagement through ecumenical relationships and organizations such as the National Council of the Churches of Christ (NCCC), rather than as the voice of a single Christian denomination. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Toward Our Mutual Flourishing: The Episcopal Church, Interreligious Relations, and Theologies of Manyness
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.