The Conflict Resolution Project

Teach, November/December 2001 | Go to article overview

The Conflict Resolution Project


Seven years ago, we developed a teaching resource on the theme of Conflict Resolution. This resource never actually appeared in TEACH Magazine but was packaged with it as an ancillary resource. At the time, it was developed as part of a Stay-in-School program and funded by Human Resources Development Canada. In the wake of recent events, we felt it was appropriate to present this resource again. At the time of writing, tensions around the world are high and people are looking for answers. Some, the minority fortunately, are pointing fingers in the wrong direction. This resource maintains its relevancy as, no matter the circumstances, conflict is never far away. It is our hope this resource will be useful to you.

We encounter conflicts every day. Whenever the needs, ideas or expectations of the people and institutions around us do not match our own, conflict can arise. Young people with few skills for dealing with conflict may feel powerless, alienated and incompetent. For these students, conflict can be especially frustrating and stressful. Equipping them with skills for dealing with conflict situations can make life in and out of school more manageable. The more students think about conflicts and methods for resolving them, the better they will become at dealing with them. This teaching unit stands as an opportunity to explore different kinds of conflicts and learn some techniques for dealing with them. But we are only scratching the surface of a fascinating and important subject. There are many excellent resources that offer a more in-depth view of conflict resolution. Some of these are listed under the section, Resources.

Learning outcomes

Students will:

A. Be presented with a method for dealing with conflict

B. Explore different kinds of conflict

C. Develop effective peer interaction skills

D. Promote positive interactions with peers and adults

E. Learn how to initiate a difficult or stressful conversation

F. Learn how to listen to and explore another's point of view

G. Learn how to talk constructively and express a point of view

H. Learn to look for a solution that is successful for both parties

Brainstorm-All about conflict

Include everything from territorial wars to fights with a sibling over bathroom rights; disagreement with a teacher over a mark to confrontations between students of different racial backgrounds. Even an internal struggle can be used: smoke a cigarette or kick the habit; drop out or stay in school; buy another chocolate bar or save the money. After completing the lists, have small groups gather to compare and discuss their lists. Does everyone always agree what a conflict is? Have the groups present their findings to the whole class.

Who are the parties involved?

There are a number of ways to look at conflict and to categorize the ones that confront us. You can think about who is in conflict. A conflict can be with yourself (intrapersonal), for example, deciding whether to wear a sweater that is a gift from a favourite aunt when you are worried that friends might laugh at you. A conflict between two or more people (interpersonal); like a guy blowing smoke in another's face. There are conflicts between individuals and institutions (a student and the school), between two groups (teachers and students) and within a single group (members of a teachers' union disagreeing over a contract offer). Look over the list of conflicts from the brainstorming session and decide who has an interest in each conflict. Find as many different ways of categorizing the conflicts as you can.

[Not Transcribed]

Positions vs. needs and interests

Ask students to imagine the scene that might take place between a parent and a teenager when the teenager arrives home an hour late without calling. Ask students to think about what the teenager and the parents might say to each other. What emotions would they express? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Conflict Resolution Project
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.