Kunia Land Developed without Aid of Historic Safeguards

By Perez, Rob | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, January 26, 2015 | Go to article overview

Kunia Land Developed without Aid of Historic Safeguards


Perez, Rob, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


* 1 / 2

* [BLACK RIGHT-POINTING TRIANGLE]

Cindy Ellen Russell / April 24

No residential use is permitted on farm lots at Kunia Loa Ridge, yet many structures in the subdivision, above, appear to be lived-in homes.

* [BLACK LEFT-POINTING TRIANGLE]

* 2 / 2

Cindy Ellen Russell / April 24

Above, historic and cultural sites have been found on the land, including this ancient Hawaiian site, where an archaeologist found iwi, or bones. It remains cordoned off.

For more than four years, work has progressed on a sprawling subdivision for small farms in Kunia where dozens of significant historic and cultural sites dot the landscape. Some date from before Native Hawaiians had contact with the outside world.

Since about 2010 the 854-acre development, called Kunia Loa Ridge Farmlands, has been transformed into a place where farmers can grow crops on up to 99 lots. Land has been cleared, dirt roads improved or added, reservoirs installed, and many structures have been built throughout the property.

Yet even as work continues, there still is no preservation or burial treatment plan -- the two documents that detail how the significant historic sites will be preserved -- in place.

The State Historic Preservation Division, which reviews and approves such plans, says it expects to get drafts from the landowner next month and that interim preservation buffers -- basically, protection zones -- have been identified for each of the historic properties. Some are blocked off by fencing.

The sites include remnants of rock walls and heiau.

Despite complaints that sites have been damaged, the division?has found no evidence of any damage, according to Susan Lebo, the division's lead archaeologist for Oahu.

But preservation advocates contend that the absence of approved plans more than four years after work started is an indication of lax government oversight.

"This project is a poster child example of what should not happen," said Donna Wong, executive director of Hawaii's Thousand Friends, a nonprofit that advocates for reasonable and responsible growth.

The Kunia Loa subdivision, a few miles off Kunia Road with access controlled through a guarded gate, is not connected to Oahu's power, water, telephone or sewer systems.

It is exempt from county subdivision requirements, such as sidewalks and paved roads, because the project falls under a 2006 state law covering leased agricultural lands. The law prohibits residential use.

The city initially took a largely hands-off approach regarding construction oversight at Kunia Loa because of another state law, enacted in 2012, that exempts certain ag structures from needing building permits on commercial farms.

The project is being developed in a region considered special by many Hawaiians for its historic link to ancient alii, or chiefs, and other cultural traditions, and the presence of many important sites.

An archaeological survey commissioned by the Kunia Loa developer identified 54 significant historic and cultural sites on the 854 acres. The survey also noted which ones need to be covered by the two plans and underscored the developer's intention of preserving traditional Hawaiian sites identified as significant.

But Hawaiians and others familiar with the area continue to question whether the state and city are adequately monitoring the development.

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs, for instance, continues to be concerned about the lack of preservation and burial treatment plans, according to an OHA spokes­man.

Shad Kane, chairman of the Oahu Council of Hawaiian Civic Clubs' committee on preservation of historic and cultural properties, likewise voiced concern.

"There's very little oversight," he said.

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, Kane used to ride horses regularly in the area. When he visited the Kunia Loa site in October, he said, the landscape had changed so much, particularly with the addition of many houselike structures, that he hardly recognized it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Kunia Land Developed without Aid of Historic Safeguards
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.