An Interpretation of Behavioral Traits of Criminal Motivation

By Jianqing, Liu | Canadian Social Science, January 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

An Interpretation of Behavioral Traits of Criminal Motivation


Jianqing, Liu, Canadian Social Science


Abstract

The criminal motivation acquisition is a characteristic of behavioral and environmental factors in the process of criminal motivation, and one of organic components in the structure of criminal motivation. The discussion of behavior traits of criminal motivation includes three aspects: behavioral factors, mechanisms and components. The basic constitutional dimensions and factors are derived from classical conditioning, operant conditioning and observational learning (social learning) and frustration reaction, which are embodied in criminal inducement, criminal object, criminal habit and other specific components of criminal motivation through reinforcement, punishment and self-reinforcement and other formation mechanisms.

Key words: Criminal motivation; Criminal object; Criminal inducement; Criminal habit

INTRODUCTION

Criminal motivation is an inner cause or a psychological strength stimulating and promoting the perpetrator to implement criminal behavior, which explores a core issue of what the psychological reasons are for the perpetrators implementing criminal behavior. Animal and human motivations have acquisition mechanisms and components, but most theories indicate that, in human behavior, acquisition motivation accounts for a greater proportion. In the exploration of acquisition motivation, the status of behaviorism is the most prominent. The main contribution of behaviorism is to examine how the behavior is acquired. That is, several types of learning not only affect the formation of motivation, but also affect the means of expression of motivation in behavior. These types of learning, including classical conditioning, operant conditioning and observational learning (social learning), have investigated means of formation and expression of human motivation and criminal motivation, behavior model from different points of view.

1. FACTORS AND MECHANISMS OF CRIMINAL MOTIVATION ACQUISITION

For the meaning of explanation of criminal motivation, classical conditioning may be also embodied in suppression and reconstruction conditioned reflex of vanishing and correction of criminal motivation. In most cases, classical conditioning modes formed by criminal motivation are unconscious and passive. However, we can artificially design and disturb to vanish or transform criminal motivation. The formation of criminal motivation and reaction of criminal behavior is the results of multiple matching of the negative stimulus (conditioned stimulus) and unconditioned stimulus (positive inner experience and "valuable behavior response tendency". On the one hand, we can predict the occurrence or change of individual behavior according to the stimulus situation and its changes; on the other hand, we can also design and arrange a particular stimulus situation to change its original tendency of criminal motivation.

The classical conditioning proposes that behavior is induced by a specific stimulus (learning predictable things), different from which, operant conditioning considers that the probability of behavior is determined by reinforcement or punishment offered after operant behavior, i.e. learning of behavioral outcomes. Operant behavior is spontaneous for organic entity, which can describe the behavior of its features based on its environmental results. Neo-behaviorism represented by Skinner has carried out a systematic research on the behavioral model caused by its reinforcement, which considers that the reinforcement is a means and measure to improve reaction probability. The reinforcement is a force to increase behaviors and an indispensable factor to shape behavior and maintain behavioral intensity; and it can be divided into positive reinforcement and negative reinforcement. Punishment is a technique for reducing the probability of behavioral response; punishment object refers to any kind of stimulus. When it is accompanied by a certain reaction, it can reduce the subsequent probability after such reaction. …

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