Our Choice/Nuestra Opción: The Imperial County, California, Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (CA-CORD)

By Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Ibarra, Leticia et al. | Childhood Obesity, February 2015 | Go to article overview

Our Choice/Nuestra Opción: The Imperial County, California, Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (CA-CORD)


Ayala, Guadalupe X., Ibarra, Leticia, Binggeli-Vallarta, Amy, Moody, Jamie, McKenzie, Thomas L., Angulo, Janette, Hoyt, Helina, Chuang, Emmeline, Ganiats, Theodore G., Gahagan, Sheila, Ji, Ming, Zive, Michelle, Schmied, Emily, Arredondo, Elva M., Elder, John P., Childhood Obesity


[Author Affiliation]

Guadalupe X. Ayala. 1 Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, and the Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego, CA.

Leticia Ibarra. 2 Programs Department, Clínicas de Salud Del Pueblo, Inc. , Brawley, CA.

Amy Binggeli-Vallarta. 3 Imperial County Public Health Department, El Centro, CA.

Jamie Moody. 4 Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego, CA.

Thomas L. McKenzie. 5 School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, San Diego State University, and the Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego, CA.

Janette Angulo. 3 Imperial County Public Health Department, El Centro, CA.

Helina Hoyt. 6 College of Nursing, San Diego State University, Imperial Valley Campus, Calexico, CA.

Emmeline Chuang. 7 Department of Health Policy and Management, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Theodore G. Ganiats. 8 Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA.

Sheila Gahagan. 9 Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA.

Ming Ji. 10 College of Nursing, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.

Michelle Zive. 9 Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA.

Emily Schmied. 11 San Diego State University-University of California at San Diego, Joint Doctoral Program in Public Health ( Health Behavior) and the Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego, CA.

Elva M. Arredondo. 1 Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, and the Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego, CA.

John P. Elder. 1 Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, and the Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego, CA.

Address correspondence to: Guadalupe X. Ayala, PhD, MPH, Professor, San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, Co-Director, Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, 9245 Sky Park Court, Suite 220, San Diego, CA 92123, E-mail: ayala@mail.sdsu.edu

Introduction

Childhood obesity remains high in the United States at 18% among 6- to 11-year-old children, despite recent declines among 2- to 5-year-olds (currently 8%).1 Among 6- to 11-year-olds, rates are highest among Hispanic children, with 27% of boys and 23% of girls in the obese range.1 More concerning are rates of overweight and obesity among Hispanic children 2-5 years of age (boys, 49%; girls, 43%).1 Children living in rural communities and on the US-Mexico border are at even greater risk. For example, Imperial County, California, has higher overweight and obese rates among fifth, seventh, and ninth graders than overall in California (47% vs. 38%).2 These rates are concerning given the consequences of childhood obesity, including adult obesity,3 associated comorbidities (e.g., diabetes4 ), compromises in quality of life,5,6 and early mortality.7 The "Our Choice...is to be healthy/Nuestra Opción...es ser saludables" (OCNO) project is designed to prevent and control obesity in a vulnerable young population living in a rural, border community.

Preventing and Controlling Childhood Obesity

Successful approaches need to target multiple sectors and levels of influence simultaneously,8-11 as indicated by the whole-child approach,12 "Total Worker Health,"13 the Social Ecological Framework (SEF),14,15 and several reviews and commentaries. …

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