Alcohol and Drug Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Literature: A Bibliography for Best Practices

By Nissen, Laura Burney | Best Practices in Mental Health, April 2014 | Go to article overview

Alcohol and Drug Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Literature: A Bibliography for Best Practices


Nissen, Laura Burney, Best Practices in Mental Health


A Snapshot of Valuable Resources for Best Practices in Mental Health and Addictions

Alcohol and drug problems remain persistent challenges for best practices in mental health. No matter what the setting, the reality is that alcohol and drug issues are likely to complicate practice and policy, if not directly drive some aspect of service development and deployment. Addictions issues are frequently cooccurring with one and often multiple other presenting problems. Yet, it is a common critique that practitioners receive too little academic preparation in this area and would benefit from additional infusions of addictions content and skills practice in their educational process (Galvani, 2007). That said, mental health practice has continued to evolve in terms of its presence and attention to the issue.

In recent years the corpus of the addictions literature has continued to expand and diversify into a number of areas and disciplines. This is both full of possibility and confounding because, due to the complexity, it can be more difficult to get a well-rounded diverse perspective on what the field has to offer. For example, the emerging neuroscience of addiction contrasted with harm reduction is further triangulated with emerging evidence-based practices with special populations. Further, the addictions literature is not one cohesive entity. It contains contradictions, competing ideologies, fragmented discipline-specific languages, and dramatically different points of view.

This bibliography was developed to provide an introductory overview to the wide range and scope of resources that exist in the addictions field, but it is specifically tailored to the needs and interests of educators, students, and practitioners of best practices in mental health where co-occurring substance use is all too common. It is intended only to serve as a snapshot from this point in time, given that every day more useful information emerges and becomes part of this body of knowledge. It is offered to assist those wishing to participate as consumers, critics, co-creators, and members of this important community. Table 1 provides a list of the topics included in the bibliography.

General

Definitions (Addictions and Recovery)

Babor, T. E, & Hall, W. (2007). Standardizing terminology in addiction science: To achieve the impossible dream. Addiction, 102, 1015-1018.

Betty Ford Institute Consensus Panel. (2007). What is recovery? A working definition from the Betty Ford Institute. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 33, 221-228.

Davidson, L., & White, W. (2007). The concept of recovery as an organizing principle for integrating mental health and addiction services. Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 34(2), 109-120.

Gifford, E., & Humphreys, K. (2007). The psychological science of addiction. Addictions, 102, 352-361.

Granfield, R., & Cloud, W. (2001). Social context and the "natural recovery": The role of social capital in the resolution of drug-associated problems. Substance Use & Misuse, 36(11), 1543-1570.

Hagerdorn, W. B. (2009). The call for a new DSM diagnosis: Addictive disorders. Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling, 29, 110-127.

Hser, Y., & Anglin, M. D. (2011). Addiction treatment and recovery careers. In J. F. Kelly and W. L. White (Eds.), Addiction recovery management: Theory, research, and practice (pp. 9-29). New York: Springer.

Laudet, A. B., & White, W. L. (2008). Recovery capital as a prospective predictor of sustained recovery, life satisfaction, and stress among former polysubstance users. Substance Use & Misuse, 43, 27-54.

Mancini, A. D. (2008). Self-determination theory: A framework for the recovery paradigm. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 14, 358-365.

McClellan, A. T, & Meyers, K. (2004). Contemporary addiction treatment: A review of problems for adults and adolescents. Biology & Psychiatry, 56, 764-770. …

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