This Mortal Coil by Wilma Derksen

Winnipeg Free Press, March 7, 2015 | Go to article overview

This Mortal Coil by Wilma Derksen


Chapter Three: Bail Hearing

All 12 of the jury members were listening intently to the judge as he continued to read his charge to them. His persuasive voice was cautiously guiding them on how to think about the evidence that had been presented to them. The judge was saying that the arrest of Mark Edward Grant for first-degree murder was not evidence.

"It is not proof of guilt. The presumption of innocence means that Mark Grant started the trial as an innocent person." This thought alone was mind-boggling. The judge continued. "This presumption stays with him throughout the case, including your deliberations at the end of the trial. It is only defeated if and when Crown counsel satisfies you beyond a reasonable doubt that Mark Grant is guilty of the crime charged." It was a difficult concept, and the judge repeated it in different ways. "Mark Grant does not have to present evidence or prove anything in this case, in particular, that he is innocent of the crime charged... It is Crown counsel who must prove Mark Grant's guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, not Mark Grant who must prove his innocence. You must find Mark Grant not guilty of first-degree murder unless Crown counsel satisfies you beyond a reasonable doubt that he is guilty of it."

Cognition -- conscious reasoning. Touch of imagination -- the ability to form new images that don't exist until imagined in a new reality.

The judge seemed to be demanding unusual mental agility from all in the courtroom who had been presented with logic during the entire time of the trial. We knew that Grant, the man sitting in the middle of this impressive, ornate room in a massive prisoner's box that dominated the room, was being charged with first-degree murder according to the investigators and the Crown. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

This Mortal Coil by Wilma Derksen
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.