Advancing Education Policy, Access to Movies and Hearing Technology

Volta Voices, January-March 2015 | Go to article overview

Advancing Education Policy, Access to Movies and Hearing Technology


AG Bell ensures that the needs of children and adults who use listening and spoken language are represented as public policy is shaped through participation in national coalitions representing consumers and professionals in the hearing health and education arenas and by raising awareness of listening and spoken language with congressional representatives and their staff.

AG Bell advocated on a number of key issues that have made a difference for children and adults with hearing loss by providing greater access to movie theater captioning, school-based accommodations, and hearing technology. AG Bell also is laying the groundwork for the shape of the future of federal education legislation.

Movie Captioning Rules

AG Bell, in collaboration with other organizations representing consumers with hearing loss and movie theater owners, announced an historic agreement in December 2014 to file joint recommendations on rulemaking for movie theater access.

In response to a U.S. Department of Justice Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) the organizations filed Joint Recommendations on Movie Captioning and Audio Description. The comments were filed by the following organizations: AG Bell, Association of Late Deafened Adults (ALDA), the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA), the National Association of the Deaf (NAD), and the National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO).

Following several weeks of discussions, the five organizations agreed on a set of recommendations, including:

* Installation of closed captioning (CC) and audio description (AD) technologies in all digital movie theater auditoriums nationwide.

* Specific minimum closed captioning device requirements with a monitoring requirement. This flexible, market-responsive device scoping method will ensure access for all deaf and hard of hearing patrons and respond to actual consumer demand.

* Reasonable compliance timelines for delivery and installation of CC and AD systems.

A joint news conference at the National Press Club on the movie theater captioning agreement resulted in extensive coverage in major media, including the LA Times, New York Times, movie theater industry media, local media and local organizations serving people with hearing loss and blogs.

This historic collaboration got the attention of the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE), which explored in its 'Money and Business" column how organizations that were former adversaries became allies in giving Consumers greater access to captioning in movie theaters, setting a precedent for other associations representing consumers and industry. Visit http://bit. ly/lyhYYll to read the interview with John Stanton, Esq., chair of the AG Bell Public Affairs Council, and find out how AG Bell advocates on your behalf. Visit ListeningandSpokenLanguage.org/ PR.MovieCaptioning/ to learn more.

Position Statement on IDEA Reauthorlzatlon

AG Bell is pleased to announce the release of its position statement on the reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Advancing Education Policy, Access to Movies and Hearing Technology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.