Heavy Industry Firms Share Info, Measures to Prevent Accidents

The Daily Yomiuri (Toyko, Japan), March 31, 2015 | Go to article overview

Heavy Industry Firms Share Info, Measures to Prevent Accidents


Alarmed by the series of serious accidents involving some of their factories in recent months, heavy industry companies are working together to improve operational safety at plants.

The ongoing efforts by steel, chemical and other heavy industry companies reflect their concerns over safety, which have been heightened by such accidents as the explosion at the Nagoya Works of Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corp. in September.

Besides taking swift action to determine the causes of the accidents, the companies are also sharing expertise to try to prevent similar accidents in the future.

Mitsui Chemicals Inc., for example, is offering without charge a safety training program open to all other companies, beginning next month. Until now, the safety training program has been conducted only for Mitsui Chemicals employees at the firm's training facility in Mobara, Chiba Prefecture.

Having already received an application from another chemical company, the head of the facility said, "We want to aggressively exchange information on safety measures."

At the facility, such accidents as catching a hand in a roller and a dangerous substance spraying from a pipe are simulated so participants can learn of the dangers they pose. Experienced staff who have worked at factories for a long time instruct the participants.

After an employee was killed in an explosion at its Iwakuni-Otake plant in Waki, Yamaguchi Prefecture, in 2012, Mitsui Chemicals reinforced its safety training program.

The Japan Petrochemical Industry Association, Japan Chemical Industry Association and Petroleum Association jointly held safety training lectures for section heads of member companies from October last year to February. …

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