Canadian Ashton Brown to Help Make History in Women's Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race

By Davidson, Neil | The Canadian Press, April 9, 2015 | Go to article overview

Canadian Ashton Brown to Help Make History in Women's Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race


Davidson, Neil, The Canadian Press


Canadian to make history in women's Boat Race

--

Canadian Ashton Brown will help make rowing history Saturday when her Cambridge crew takes on Oxford in the 70th edition of the Oxford-Cambridge women's boat race.

For the first time, the women will tackle the same 6.8-kilometre horseshoe-shaped course as the men on the River Thames in west London.

"There's no comparable race in the rowing world," said Brown.

In the past, the women competed over a two-kilometre straight course at Henley-on-Thames a week before the men raced.

Brown, 26, says the men's Tideway course takes its toll.

"You're in a lot of pain when you finish ... Every muscle is telling you to stop," said Brown.

The Oxford men won in 18 minutes 35 seconds last year. Compare that to the 5:50 that the Oxford women posted in winning at Henley.

The women will race an hour before the men Saturday.

Born in Lethbridge, Alta., Brown grew up in Calgary. She did her undergraduate degree in economics at Princeton, where she started rowing seriously.

Brown had first tried the sport at a summer camp in Grade 10. Posters for rowing tryouts at Princeton, saying no experience needed, lured her back in.

"I figured I was a step ahead of no experience, but not very far," she said.

That was back in 2007. An assistant coach thought she had no potential, which drove Brown to prove her wrong.

"After a couple of months I fell in love with it," she said.

Brown, who has nothing but good things to say about Princeton's longtime head coach Lori Dauphiny, won the national championship in her final year as the Princeton boat won all 13 of its races.

After Princeton, she was invited to train with the Canadian national team ahead of the 2012 Olympics. But Rowing Canada thought the five-foot-seven Brown was better suited to sculling than sweep-rowing.

Rather than go back to the drawing board, she eventually left to take a job with an investment firm that managed Princeton's endowments. While she enjoyed the work, she found herself spending her spare time reading academic papers related to her undergraduate research.

"I thought if I'm doing it on the weekend, I should be doing it for a job," she said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Canadian Ashton Brown to Help Make History in Women's Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.