Indigenous Urban School Leadership (IUSL): A Critical Cross-Cultural Comparative Analysis of Educational Leaders in New Zealand and the United States/ Leadership Autochtone, Urbain et Scolaire (LAUS): Une Analyse Critique, Cross-Culturelle et Comparative Des Leaders éDucatifs En Nouvelle Zélande et Aux ÉTats-Unis

By Santamaría, Lorri J.; Santamaría, Andrés P. et al. | Comparative and International Education, June 2014 | Go to article overview

Indigenous Urban School Leadership (IUSL): A Critical Cross-Cultural Comparative Analysis of Educational Leaders in New Zealand and the United States/ Leadership Autochtone, Urbain et Scolaire (LAUS): Une Analyse Critique, Cross-Culturelle et Comparative Des Leaders éDucatifs En Nouvelle Zélande et Aux ÉTats-Unis


Santamaría, Lorri J., Santamaría, Andrés P., Webber, Melinda, Pearson, Hoana, Comparative and International Education


Wanted: Innovations in Educational Leadership

Academic achievement gaps are the contemporary schooling educational pandemic of this age. These gaps form deep chasms separating children from impoverished backgrounds, who may also be students of colour 1 , from their mainstream and traditionally higher socioeconomic peers in Canada (CAN), the United States (US), New Zealand (NZ), Australia (AUS), and the United Kingdom (UK). Educational leadership has been identified in related literature as fitting to address and alleviate these gaps, after classroom-based educational reform such as the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation in the US and pedagogical approaches like culturally responsive pedagogy have been met with limited success. Education finds itself now in a stark era of accountability, high stakes assessment, league tables, and like reform measures. The system has identified the most able educational leaders as those who are able to sustain high levels of academic student achievement in schools representative of significant student subgroups at the lower ends of the achievement gap. Addressing academic disparities have proven to be daunting for educational leaders serving students and communities with high levels of increasing cultural and linguistic diversity. Schools where diversity is most prevalent are likely to be urban in nature or schools where students who have been historically disenfranchised and traditionally marginalized by systems of inequality based primarily on race, ethnicity, culture, gender, social class, language, and/ or disability are taught.

"Closing the educational achievement gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous learners is a shared and urgent policy priority" (Cottrell, 2010, p. 223). Maori, the people Indigenous to Aotearoa2-NZ, comprise 15% of the population (Statistics New Zealand, 2014). Similar to other Indigenous groups and people of colour in the US and CAN, following industrialisation an unprecedented number of Maori families moved to thriving cities in NZ and all over the world (e.g., Maori settlement in the UK) for work and a better life. Today as a result, as in comparable international urban centres, there are growing numbers of Maori in urban schools in NZ. This growing cultural and linguistic diversity, offering innovative opportunities that are simultaneously perceived as challenges to the mainstream, necessitates innovative leadership practices to meet the unique needs of Indigenous, multicultural, multilingual, and bicultural students and communities. In the US there are similarly complex demographic opportunities rich with multiple levels of cultural and linguistic diversity. Where increased diversity is challenging for most school site leaders, some research findings indicate leaders of colour find leading for diversity an opportunity to serve their communities with empathy, understanding, and expertise (Bishop, Berryman, Cavanagh, & Teddy, 2009; Jean-Marie, 2008). Other researchers warn that there may be consequences if educators continue to disregard culture as related to the practice of educational leadership (Walker & Dimmock, 1999). Historically underserved students and their families look to educational leaders to change status quo educational practices and usher in educational systems where more learners can enjoy academic achievement than has been the norm. Research findings suggest when leaders of colour with critical3 dispositions or those who otherwise choose to lead with a critical disposition are recruited, adequately prepared, and their practice is sustained, students and communities that have had limited academic success are more appropriately served (Santamaría, 2013; Santamaría & Santamaría, 2012).

Building on previous studies, this strengths-based qualitative inquiry aims to explore the leadership practices of Kerehi (pseudonym), a Maori primary school principal, juxtaposed with the shared leadership practices of nine educational leaders of colour in the US, to make a case for a cross-cultural model toward international urban school leadership. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Indigenous Urban School Leadership (IUSL): A Critical Cross-Cultural Comparative Analysis of Educational Leaders in New Zealand and the United States/ Leadership Autochtone, Urbain et Scolaire (LAUS): Une Analyse Critique, Cross-Culturelle et Comparative Des Leaders éDucatifs En Nouvelle Zélande et Aux ÉTats-Unis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.