Perception of Political Subjectivity on the Internet: Results of the Cross-National Cluster Analysis in the USA, United Kingdom, Mexico, Sweden, Russia, China, the Republic of South Africa

By Nechaev, Vladimir Dmitrievich; Brodovskaya, Elena Victorovna et al. | Asian Social Science, April 2015 | Go to article overview

Perception of Political Subjectivity on the Internet: Results of the Cross-National Cluster Analysis in the USA, United Kingdom, Mexico, Sweden, Russia, China, the Republic of South Africa


Nechaev, Vladimir Dmitrievich, Brodovskaya, Elena Victorovna, Dombrovskaya, Anna Yurievna, Asian Social Science


Abstract

The paper presents the preliminary results of the cluster analysis devoted to the national databases research of the World Internet Project - 2012 in Russia, Sweden, China, United Kingdom, Mexico, USA and the Republic of South Africa. The purpose of cluster analysis is to classify the respondents in accordance to the characteristics of the perception of political subjectivity on the Internet. Social profiles of different user groups in selected countries can help to identify different national strategies of political activities in the "World Wide Web".

Keywords: internet communication, political activities on the Internet, cross-national cluster analysis

1. Introduction

The Internet has become one of the most significant tools of transforming communicative, political and social-cultural environment of the modern societies. It tends to be a centre of political empowerment of citizens all over the world.

Political recourses of the virtual space are an important research subject for a number of scientists all over the world (Anokhin, 2012; Runet.fom.ru, 2014; Brodovskaya & Shumilova, 2013; Bubnov, Dmitrieva, & Shapovalov, 2013; Dolgorukov, 2013; Davis, 2002; Elyakov, 2009). They reveal political effects of the Internet communication. There is a variety of sociological studies devoted to perception of political subjectivity on the Internet (Grachev, 2009; Greene, 2012), one of them is the "World Internet Project - 2012" in 50 countries (World internet project, 2014).

The purpose of this study is to identify the perception of the national political subjectivity on the Internet. Empirical objects of comparative analyses are 7 countries (China, Russia, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States, Mexico, and South Africa). The choice of these countries was determined by the desire to achieve a wide geography of a sample of countries with different systems of political, economic and social system.

2. Method

To collect data it was used mass pool of Russians (N=1600, sample is representative for such areas like residence, district, gender and age) mass pool of citizens of China (1500 respondents, sample is representative for such areas like residence, district, gender and age), Sweden (2700 respondents, sample is representative for such areas like residence, district, gender and age), UK (2057 respondents, sample is representative for such areas like residence, district, gender and age), Mexico (2000 respondents, sample is representative for the type area of residence, district, gender and age), South Africa (1589 respondents, sample is representative for such areas like residence, district, gender and age), USA (1351 respondents, sample is representative for such areas like residence, district, gender and age). To verify the received data we clustered the selection of the World Internet Project in selected country with SPSS for Windows 18.0.

Procedure of allocation of clusters. The massif from the 7 countries is considered as a unit and in this "uniform" massif types of the Internet users are allocated. Further there will be an opportunity to allocate the same types of users and in the new countries.

In separate group those who "Don't use the Internet" are allocated

Behavioral aspects of using a network are selected for cluster analysis:

- Intensity of use of the Internet in house (in a week)

- Intensity of use of the Internet at workplace (in a week)

- Intensity of use of the Internet in educational institutions (in a week)

- Intensity of use of the Internet somewhere else (in a week)

- Intensity of use of wireless mobile devices for the Internet connection

- Experience of use of wireless mobile devices for the Internet connection

- Intensity of use of e-mail

- Intensity of communication in chats

- Intensity of implementation of phone calls on the Internet

- Intensity of filling by a content of the blog

- Intensity of placement of the photos or pictures on the Internet

- Intensity of updating of the status on a social network

- Intensity of communicational activity

- Intensity of search on the Internet of some information connected with travel

- Intensity of search on the Internet of some information on new work

- Intensity of reading/searching on the Internet of some jokes, a comic content

- Intensity of search on the Internet of some information connected with health

- Intensity of participation in games on the Internet

- Intensity of shopping on the Internet

- Intensity of booking of services online

- Intensity of payment of accounts online

- Intensity of use of services of banks online

- Intensity of commission of investments into actions / bonds/funds on the Internet

- Intensity of search of definition of term/concept of the Internet

- Intensity of the information search about the concrete fact

- Intensity of the information search, connected with education

- Intensity of a distance learning

For allocation of types the Internet of users is used a method of k-means cluster. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Perception of Political Subjectivity on the Internet: Results of the Cross-National Cluster Analysis in the USA, United Kingdom, Mexico, Sweden, Russia, China, the Republic of South Africa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.