Chronology: Iran

The Middle East Journal, Spring 2015 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Iran


See also Syria, Yemen

Oct. 20: Police arrested four men accused of carrying out four separate acid attacks on four women, causing serious injuries to the victims, some of whom were sitting in their cars at the time of the attack. Men on motorcycles carried out the attacks in Isfahan as a part of the recent campaign against women who are accused of being improperly veiled. The attacks came a day after the Majlis, Iran's parliament, passed a law permitting citizens to correct women and men who they feel are not adhering to Iran's social laws, including modest dress and veiling. [NYT, 10/20]

Oct. 22: An estimated 2,000 Iranians gathered in Isfahan and Tehran to protest the recent acid attacks targeting women in the preceding three weeks. In Isfahan, demonstrators gathered in front of local judiciary offices and condemned the attackers, comparing them to supporters of the Islamic State in Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). In Tehran, several hundred protested in front of the parliament building. The protests, organized through social media, were a rare occurrence, given the state crackdown on demonstrations during the 2009 election. [NYT, 10/22]

Oct. 25: Reyhaneh Jabbari, a 26-yearold woman, was hanged after being convicted of the 2007 murder of her alleged rapist. International human rights groups condemned the execution given concerns over the legitimacy of the trial, and cited the incident as an example of ongoing injustice towards women in Iran. [BBC, 10/25]

Nov. 3: An estimated 10,000 people gathered in Tehran to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the takeover of the United States embassy in 1979. The demonstrators chanted nationalist slogans and burned American, British, and Israeli flags. [NYT, 11/3]

Nov. 11: Russia and Iran signed a new nuclear agreement that allowed Russia to build two new nuclear reactors in Iran and the possibility of six more in the future, which would operate under international surveillance. …

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