Hatemail: Anti-Semitism on Picture Postcards

By Sion, Brigitte | Shofar, Spring 2015 | Go to article overview

Hatemail: Anti-Semitism on Picture Postcards


Sion, Brigitte, Shofar


HATEMAIL: ANTI-SEMITISM ON PICTURE POSTCARDS Salo Aizenbereg. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2013. viii + 238 pp.

There is something paradoxical in admiring an oversized book with high-quality color illustrations when these images carry the most violent mitic Hatemail: Anti-Semitism on Picture Postcards elicits such ambiguous sentiments. Nevertheless, Salo Aizenberg has made excellent choices in selecting and curating hundreds of postcards from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth century, mostly from Germany, France, the United States, and the United Kingdom. The layout and quality of the reproductions are outstanding, and match the diversity and the richness of the material. It is unfortunate, however, that such a large sample of picture postcards does not receive deeper analysis, from production to usage to collection. Indeed, the picture postcard was first published in the second half of the nineteenth century; it became immediately popular as a quick and cheap communications means, as a visible platform for caricaturists and other artists, and as worthy ephemera from a collector's perspective. Aizenberg sometimes provides detailed information about a publisher, an artist, or the specific historical context, but his treatment and depth of analysis are uneven. The main problem with this book is that it tries to do too many things, and ends up all over the place, tackling issues superficially. The author provides a lot of historical context that is not always necessary, and takes up space at the detriment of a deeper analysis of postcards as an artistic creation, new media, and political commentary. For example, he invokes Daniel Goldhagen's book Hitler's Willing Executioners to make sweeping statements that are neither convincing nor informative: "I don't believe that it is a coincidence that German anti-Semitic postcards outclassed other nations in the virulence of their hatred. It makes sense based on the acts committed against Jews that were so easily accepted in the 1930s and 1940s. In contrast, American and British anti-Semitic postcards were significantly significantly more benign, usually depicting 'humorous' images of greedy, large-nosed Jews, but not Jews as demonic or Jews being expelled and persecuted" (12). Unfortunately, a more refined analysis would have shown that during the Dreyfus Affair (1894-1906), an extraordinary number of pro-Dreyfus postcards were designed and published in Germany, as a means to mock the French authorities for their relentlessness against the Jewish captain. Another angle worth pursuing would be to follow a specific artist over the course of a decade or two, and note any change in message, tone, or political affiliation, as was the case with the Frenchman Orens, among others. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hatemail: Anti-Semitism on Picture Postcards
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.