How to Accommodate Different Learning Styles in the Same Classroom: Analysis of Theories and Methods of Learning Styles

By Yassin, Baderaddin Mahmood; Almasri, Mohammad Abdulmajid | Canadian Social Science, May 1, 2015 | Go to article overview

How to Accommodate Different Learning Styles in the Same Classroom: Analysis of Theories and Methods of Learning Styles


Yassin, Baderaddin Mahmood, Almasri, Mohammad Abdulmajid, Canadian Social Science


Abstract

Effective learning has always been a major concern for many educational associations. It is considered one of the most important learning processes that occur in the classroom. Teachers who are interested in understanding the process of the methods of achieving effective learning look hard for the appropriate pedagogical methods that enable them to improve classroom instruction and cover all types of students in the classroom. When the effective learning is achieved in the classroom, students can benefit from what they learn not only inside classroom but also outside classrooms. To achieve effective learning as well as effective teaching, it might be necessary for teachers to become familiar with students' methods and theories of learning (Hunt, 2011; Kumar, & Chacko, 2010). This research paper sheds light on the theories and the models of learning and teaching styles and how they play an important role in the lives of students in classroom.

Key words: Learning style; Teaching style; Effective learning; ESL

INTRODUCTION

Nowadays, the learning style concept is widely used in many educational associations worldwide. After an extensive review of learning style literature to give a clear and vivid knowledge about learning style concept, it was difficult to locate the roots of learning styles, and articles of the one who created the concept of learning style is vague. However, the concept of learning style is used to describe the idea of individuals having different learning preferences that aid them with the preferred methods needed to achieve effective and meaningful learning.

Sarasin (1999) defined learning styles as "the preference or predisposition of an individual to perceive and process information in a particular way or combination of ways" (p.3). According to Sarasin (1999), learning styles can be understood not only in terms of learning preferences but also in terms of intelligence. Learning styles can be explored through intelligence or through primary senses of human beings. Grasha (1990) described the idea of learning style as the way in which students give preference for thinking, relating to others, different experiences, and for different classroom environment and experiences.

The idea of learning styles emphasizes that individuals learn differently and prefer to be taught differently. Several researchers such as Dunn (1983), Moran (1991), Hunt, Rensulli, Gardner and Hatch, and Kolb (1976) were interested in learning styles of students; they investigated students' learning style preferences, and the variables that affect the preferences of those learning styles of students (Gallaher & Nunn, 1998). Most of their research studies support the idea that students can master the curriculum if they are taught with different strategies or different methods that complete what they lack in classroom instructions. According to Dunn (1999); Tulbure (2011), most students cannot internalize new and difficult academic information without relying on their learning styles. As a result, teachers will find it difficult if learning styles are ignored in classrooms.

Jahiel (2008) discussed three types of learning styles: visual, kinesthetic, and auditory learning styles. According to Jahiel, most of the misunderstanding, confusion, lack of attention, or the students' feeling of blaming themselves for being not clever enough to understand the lesson is due to the lack of communication between the students and the instructors. The problem happens when teachers insist on teaching using their own teaching methods without paying attention to the students' learning styles. As a result, students will not comprehend the materials and will blame themselves for not being able to understand the lesson.

Gardner and Hatch (1989) discussed the idea of how people learn differently and have different kinds of intelligences. If a student is not good in one of the subjects, it does not mean that he or she is a low achiever. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

How to Accommodate Different Learning Styles in the Same Classroom: Analysis of Theories and Methods of Learning Styles
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.