Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture

By Hauptman, Robert | Journal of Information Ethics, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture


Hauptman, Robert, Journal of Information Ethics


Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture Alan Sokal. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. 465 pp. $34.95

In 1996, Alan Sokal perpetrated a hoax, one that he held to be useful, beneficial, and ethical, since, unlike most frauds, he immediately revealed what he had done. Nevertheless, the publication of "Transgressing the Boundaries" was a hoax that hoodwinked the editors of Social Text as well as those readers who did not learn that the paper was a parody. This simple 35 page essay subsequently spawned an ongoing library of works from Sokal's pen: The explanation in Lingua Franca, an afterword published in Dissent, a lecture at NYU, an essay in House Built on Sand, Jean Bricmont and the author's Fashionable Nonsense (originally published in French and then in Great Britain under a different title), and now this enormous collection which includes many of the aforementioned works as well as some new essays on a diversity of extrapolated topics. Sokal begins by reprinting the text of "Transgressing" on right- hand pages; on the facing left- hand one finds a series of extensive annotations explaining and commenting, as if this were an arcane theological text glossed by a wise but hermetic scholar secreted away on Mt. Athos. Thus, the original 35 pages have grown to 87, which admittedly include many blank left- hand pages. Some of the other reprinted works contain new footnoted remarks.

Sokal is a scientist and thus it is no surprise that he advocates the application of logic, reason, and evidence when analyzing and attempting to draw conclusions about the physical and social world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.