Today in Music History - June 25

The Canadian Press, June 12, 2015 | Go to article overview

Today in Music History - June 25


Today in Music History - June 25

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Today in Music History for June 25:

In 1615, two Roman Catholic priests sang the mass in Quebec City. Samuel de Champlain, who founded the city in 1608, reported it was the first instance of sung mass in New France.

In 1944, Robert Charlebois, one of Quebec's most influential pop singers, was born in Montreal.

In 1963, singer George Michael (real name Georgios Kyriacos Panayiotou), one of the biggest pop stars of the late 1980s, was born in London. Michael and Andrew Ridgeley formed the duo "Wham!," which hit the British chart in 1982 with "Young Guns (Go For It)." North American success followed with three straight No. 1 hits in 1984 -- "Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go," "Careless Whisper" and "Everything She Wants." When they broke up in 1986, Michael began a highly successful solo career. He dueted with Aretha Franklin on "I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)," which went to No. 1. Then came the multi-million-selling "Faith" album, which yielded such chart toppers as the title track, "Father Figure" and "One More Try" and captured a Grammy. The album also contained "I Want Your Sex," which some radio stations refused to play despite Michael's claim it endorsed monogamy. In 1990, Michael released "Listen Without Prejudice, Volume One." Although it made the top-10, the album did not match the sales figures of his solo debut. After a chart-topping duet with Elton John on "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me" in 1991, Michael was pretty much kept out of the recording studio until 1996 by a protracted dispute with his record company, Sony. In 1998, he was arrested for lewd behaviour in a Beverly Hills washroom. Later, he announced he was gay.

In 1967, "The Beatles" performed "All You Need is Love" on the "Our World international" television program seen by 200 million people. The performance was released as a live recording on July 7. In the studio for the TV show were members of "The Rolling Stones," "The Who" and other groups.

In 1969, Mick Taylor, who replaced Brian Jones as "The Rolling Stones" guitarist, made his first appearance with the group at the Coliseum in Rome. Jones would be found dead in the swimming pool of his home a week later.

In 1978, the legendary power-rock trio "Cream" -- Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker -- reunited for a show at Baker's polo club. The three had not played together for 10 years.

In 1978, the Riverboat coffeehouse in Toronto's Yorkville district closed after four concerts each by Dan Hill and Murray McLauchlan. The Riverboat was the showcase for Canadian folk performers in the late 1960s -- singers such as Gordon Lightfoot, Bruce Cockburn and Joni Mitchell. Several popular folk songs, including Phil Ochs' "Changes" and Joni Mitchell's "Clouds," were composed at the club.

In 1983, legendary 1950s rock guitarist Duane Eddy began his first U.S. tour in 15 years, in San Francisco.

In 1984, the future Mrs. Springsteen, Patty Scialfa, joined Bruce Springsteen's "E Street Band" four days before "The Boss" began his "Born in the U.S.A." tour.

In 1984, Prince released his "Purple Rain" album.

In 1987, Boudleaux Bryant, one of Nashville's most prolific songwriters, died of cancer at age 67. Bryant and his wife Felice wrote many of "The Everly Brothers'" hits, including "Bye Bye Love," "Wake Up Little Susie" and "All I Have to Do Is Dream."

In 1988, Hillel Slovak, guitarist with the Los Angeles-based "Red Hot Chili Peppers," died of a heroin overdose in Haifa, Israel, at age 26. His replacement was John Frusciante.

In 1988, singer Jimmy Soul, who topped the charts in 1963 with "If You Want to Be Happy," died. Soul, whose real name was James McLeese, died in New York of a heart attack at age 45.

In 1988, Debbie Gibson became the youngest artist to ever write, produce and perform a No. 1 hit, when "Foolish Beat" hit the top of the charts. She graduated from high school the next day. …

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