Schools Grapple with 'Have A-Levels, Will Travel' Culture

By Morrison, Nick | Times Educational Supplement, June 5, 2015 | Go to article overview

Schools Grapple with 'Have A-Levels, Will Travel' Culture


Morrison, Nick, Times Educational Supplement


Growing trend for overseas study a challenge for careers advisers

A rise in the number of students planning to go to university overseas is giving schools a new challenge in providing advice for sixth-formers.

Helping students to navigate university applications traditionally required a thorough knowledge of the Ucas (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) system.

But school leaders have warned that the increasing popularity of far-flung study destinations will require sixth-form tutors and careers advisers to become more savvy about universities outside the UK.

A survey by the British Council revealed that more than a third of students are interested in studying abroad. And the number planning to do so at undergraduate level has risen sharply, from 35 per cent last year to 50 per cent now.

Although almost half the respondents (47 per cent) said they wanted to spend just a year abroad, a quarter (26 per cent) were hoping to take their entire degree course overseas.

Hilary French, headteacher of Newcastle High School for Girls, said the numbers of students applying to study abroad had risen in recent years. "It is a growing trend, not only because of the cost but also for the courses and the whole international dimension," she said.

Students on sports scholarships in the US could expect specialised coaching and many European universities offered more contact time than their UK equivalents, particularly in humanities subjects, she added.

Small world

The most popular destination was the US, favoured by four in 10 of those interested in studying overseas, followed by Australia on 11 per cent.

But non-Anglophone countries also featured, with France, Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, Japan and Italy all featuring in the top 10.

"The world is a shrinking place and [students] need to demonstrate a much broader skill set and be much more adventurous, less insular and less introverted," Ms French said.

Ucas has recently made provision for European universities to join its admissions service, meaning that students could include a non-UK choice among their options. So far, Amsterdam Fashion Academy is the only overseas institution to sign up.

"Each university has different criteria and it is our responsibility to advise the girls. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Schools Grapple with 'Have A-Levels, Will Travel' Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.