Today in Music History - June 29

The Canadian Press, June 19, 2015 | Go to article overview

Today in Music History - June 29


Today in Music History - June 29

--

Today in Music History for June 29:

In 1888, the first musical recording in Britain was made at the Crystal Palace in London on the occasion of the Handel Festival. The recording was made using Thomas Edison's cylinder phonograph.

In 1901, singer Nelson Eddy, whose duets with Jeanette MacDonald were great favourites in the 1930s and '40s, was born in Providence, R.I. He died on March 6, 1967.

In 1941, Polish pianist Ignace Jan Paderewski died in wartime exile in New York at 81. His brilliant playing made him the world's most popular pianist since Franz Liszt in the mid-19th century. U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt vowed Paderewski's remains would be returned to his homeland "when Poland is free." They were shipped home in 1992, three years after Communist rule ended in Poland.

In 1944, singer Little Eva, whose full name is Eva Narcissus Boyd, was born in Belhaven, N.C. She was the babysitter for songwriters Carole King and Gerry Goffin when she recorded their song, "The Loco-Motion." It went to No. 1 in the summer of 1962. The background singers on the record were a group called "The Cookies," who had a hit of their own later in '62 with "Chains." Little Eva died in Kinston, N.C., after a long illness on April 10, 2003.

In 1955, Bill Haley's "Rock Around the Clock" reached No. 1 on the U.S. charts, staying in the top spot for seven weeks. Haley's recording sold only moderately well when it was first released in the spring of 1954. But when it was included in the soundtrack of "Blackboard Jungle," a film about juvenile delinquents, demand for the record soared. By 1970, world sales of "Rock Around the Clock" by "Bill Haley and the Comets" were estimated at 16 million copies. The record was also the first to sell one million copies in Britain, and has been on the British charts seven times, most recently in 1974.

In 1963, Del Shannon hit the charts with "From Me To You," the first "Beatles" cover tune on the American charts.

In 1967, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of "The Rolling Stones" were found guilty in London on drug possession charges resulting from arrests in February. Jagger was sentenced to three months and Richards to a year. The sentences were suspended on appeal. After the convictions, "The Rolling Stones" temporarily withdrew from public appearances.

In 1969, Jimi Hendrix performed for the last time with "The Experience" in Denver.

In 1969, Motown singer Shorty Long died in a boating accident. He was only 29. A year earlier, Long had scored a top-10 hit with his novelty recording of "Here Comes the Judge," a routine developed by comic Pigmeat Markham. Markham also made the Billboard Hot 100 with his version.

In 1973, vocalist Ian Gillan and bass guitarist Roger Glover played their last concert with "Deep Purple." After the show in Japan, Gillan left the band for a solo career while Glover opted for session and production work. Their replacements with "Deep Purple" were David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes. They have since reunited with "Deep Purple."

In 1975, folk singer Tim Buckley died of a heroin and morphine overdose in Santa Monica, Calif., at age 28. Testimony at the coroner's inquest indicated Buckley had snorted what he thought was cocaine. The man who owned the house where Buckley died was convicted of involuntary manslaughter.

In 1978, guitarist and singer Peter Frampton suffered a broken arm, cracked ribs, and scalp lacerations after crashing his car in the Bahamas.

In 1979, Lowell George, former lead singer of the rock band "Little Feat," died of an apparent heart attack in Arlington, Va. He was 34. George had just released a solo album following the breakup of "Little Feat," and was on tour with his own band when he died. "Little Feat" was formed in Los Angeles in 1969 by George and Roy Estrada, both former members of "The Mothers of Invention." The group's mixture of southern music forms, such as blues and boogie, with mystical lyrics resulted in a gold album, the live "Waiting For Columbus," in 1978. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Today in Music History - June 29
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.