Horner Gives Up Position Leading Board of Education

By Kalani, Nanea | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, July 8, 2015 | Go to article overview

Horner Gives Up Position Leading Board of Education


Kalani, Nanea, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


Donald Horner, who has led the state Board of Education since 2011, announced Tuesday he is stepping down as its chairman this month.

The retired banker was one of former Gov. Neil Abercrombie's initial appointments to the volunteer board, after a 2010 constitutional amendment did away with an elected school board.

Horner told his fellow BOE members Tuesday he is resigning from the chairman post, effective July 21. He said he believed it was a good time to "pass the gavel," with the board expected to elect committee leadership posts at its July 21 meeting.

"As we transition with new members and committee assignments, I believe this is an opportune time to begin an orderly transition of leadership at the board," Horner said in a statement.

By law the governor appoints the chairman of the nine-member board, which is charged with forming statewide educational policy, adopting student performance standards and assessment models, monitoring school success and appointing the superintendent.

"It has been a privilege and honor to serve as the first appointed chair. Over the past four years, we have accomplished many of our objectives, and the (Department of Education) has assembled a highly capable senior management team," Horner said.

The law requires the governor to appoint a chairman from among the board's three at-large members. Besides Horner, the board's at-large members are University of Hawaii associate professor Patricia Hala­gao, whom Abercrombie named to the board in 2013, and Central Pacific Bank President Lance Mizu­moto, whom Ige named to the board earlier this year.

During Horner's tenure the board adopted the first-ever joint BOE-DOE strategic plan, which Horner credits for setting a bold course for improvement and fostering collaboration around a shared vision. …

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