Pipelines, Climate Change on the Agenda as Harper, Notley Meet in Calgary

By Krugel, Lauren | The Canadian Press, July 6, 2015 | Go to article overview

Pipelines, Climate Change on the Agenda as Harper, Notley Meet in Calgary


Krugel, Lauren, The Canadian Press


Harper, Notley discuss climate change, pipelines

--

CALGARY - Climate change, pipelines and flood mitigation were on the agenda Monday as Alberta Premier Rachel Notley and Prime Minister Stephen Harper had their first formal meeting.

If there was tension between the NDP premier and the Conservative prime minister, neither let on. In a photo opportunity before the meeting, Notley asked Harper about how his Stampede had been so far and the two tipped their cowboy hats for the cameras.

After the meeting, Notley said it wasn't her impression that recent Alberta efforts to toughen the rules for large carbon emitters were a "huge irritant" for Harper.

"I think it's fair to say he acknowledged that some of the numbers that we put out had been floating around within the oil and gas boardrooms for a while," she said.

Last month, the Alberta government said it would require facilities that emit more than 100,000 tonnes of CO2 to reduce their carbon intensity by 20 per cent in 2017, versus 12 per cent currently.

For emissions that go above that threshold, the price of carbon is doubling to $30 a tonne in 2017. The province has also appointed University of Alberta economist Andrew Leach to lead a panel that will help develop a broader climate change strategy.

Notley said they also talked about TransCanada Corp.'s (TSX:TRP) Energy East pipeline to the East Coast and Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain expansion to the Vancouver area -- two proposals she supports.

On Trans Mountain, she said there was some discussion about what Ottawa can do to boost spill recovery efforts in the Lower Mainland. …

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