Today in History - July 19

The Canadian Press, July 10, 2015 | Go to article overview

Today in History - July 19


Today in History - July 19

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Today in History for July 19:

On this date:

In 1553, 15-year-old Lady Jane Grey was deposed as Queen of England after only nine days. King Henry VIII's daughter Mary was proclaimed Queen and had Jane executed.

In 1692, five Massachusetts women were hanged for witchcraft. Fifteen young girls in the Salem community and as many 150 citizens in the area were charged with witchcraft during the greater part of that year.

In 1701, the Iroquois deeded hunting ground north of Lake Ontario and west of Lake Michigan to England.

In 1771, Thomas Talbot, colonist of Upper Canada, was born in Malahide, Ireland. After serving as private secretary to Gov. John Graves Simcoe, Talbot became on official promoter of settlement in Upper Canada. Talbot settled portions of 29 townships in southwestern Ontario along the north shore of Lake Erie.

In 1814, Matthew Flinders, English explorer of Australia, died.

In 1843, loose, knee-length women's trousers were introduced by their American creator, Amelia Jenks Bloomer. They became known as bloomers.

In 1848, the modern women's rights movement was launched with a two-day convention in Seneca Falls, N.Y. The meeting to discuss the social, civil, and religious rights of women was planned six days earlier by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and four women friends who had gathered for tea. Women attending the meeting approved 12 resolutions, including one demanding women be given the right to vote.

In 1865, Charles Mayo, surgeon and co-founder of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, was born in Minnesota.

In 1870, the French government declared war on Prussia.

In 1875, the Parliament of Canada Act defined the powers and privileges of its members.

In 1877, Spencer Gore won the first Wimbledon tennis final.

In 1894, the man who slashed dinner preparation time for millions was born in Howland, Maine. While working for the Raytheon Company, Percy Spencer discovered a more efficient way to manufacture magnetrons. That led to his 1945 invention of the microwave oven, as well as major advances in radar.

In 1900, the 14-km main line of the Paris subway opened after two years of construction.

In 1903, Maurice Garin of France won the first Tour de France.

In 1904, construction began on the Liverpool Cathedral in England. The cathedral was completed 20 years later and consecrated on this same date in 1924.

In 1912, about 14,000 particles struck the Earth in a meteor shower near Holbrook, Ariz.

In 1921, prohibition came into effect in Ontario.

In 1924, Hi Bell of the St. Louis Cardinals pitched two complete-game victories over the Boston Braves.

In 1937, Canada's first bilingual currency was issued by the Bank of Canada.

In 1940, while launching Britain's "V For Victory," campaign, Prime Minister Winston Churchill flashed his famous two-fingered victory salute for the first time.

In 1940, the Canadian House of Commons passed the Unemployment Insurance Act.

In 1941, BBC broadcasts to Europe urged the creation of resistance forces with the slogan "V for Victory."

In 1943, the Allies bombed Rome, killing 1,400 people.

In 1951, a probe was launched in Quebec City into the disappearance of a cannon that had been captured by the British from the Americans in 1776. Americans were suspected, but it turned out that officers of the Royal Canadian Air Force had taken the 350-kg cannon from the Citadel as a joke.

In 1957, the first U.S. rocket with an atomic warhead was tested over the Nevada desert.

In 1958, Princess Margaret opened the Okanagan Lake Bridge in Kelowna, B.C. The three-lane floating corridor became the most congested stretch of highway in the province outside the Lower Mainland. It was replaced by the five-lane William R. Bennett Bridge in 2008.

In 1965, the Yukon and Northwest Territories were represented for the first time at a federal-provincial conference. …

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