Winnipeg Lawyer Who Lost Hand in Bombing Describes Frantic Moments after Blast

By Lambert, Steve | The Canadian Press, July 10, 2015 | Go to article overview

Winnipeg Lawyer Who Lost Hand in Bombing Describes Frantic Moments after Blast


Lambert, Steve, The Canadian Press


Winnipeg lawyer describes moments after bombing

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WINNIPEG - Maria Mitousis clearly remembers the explosion that almost killed her as she worked in her small family law practice -- a blast from a seemingly harmless mail package that police allege was sent by an ex-husband of one of her clients.

In a statement released Friday through Winnipeg police, Mitousis recounted assessing her condition immediately after the bomb went off last week.

"I have my teeth, I can see, I can blink," the statement read.

"I'm going to get past this. I live in the moment," she recalled thinking as emergency responders rushed her to hospital where she would undergo 10 hours of surgery.

The extent of Mitousis's injuries became clearer Friday. Police confirmed the lawyer lost her right hand and her left was severely injured. She suffered "countless" injuries to her face, chest and thighs, said Const. Jason Michalyshen.

Despite the injuries, Mitousis expressed confidence and hope during an hour-long meeting with Michalyshen, he added.

"One of the first things she said was, 'I want people to know I'm OK. I'll get better.' She is going to go back to doing what she does as a lawyer."

Michalyshen said Mitousis recalled playing golf hours before the explosion and "remembered how at peace she was out on the golf course."

"What became most evident is that Maria is an incredibly resilient person."

The explosion last Friday was the first of what police allege was a targeted campaign of revenge by Guido Amsel, a 49-year-old man who had gone through a long and bitter divorce. …

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