Right Up with the Best of Them

By King, Francis | The Spectator, July 12, 2003 | Go to article overview

Right Up with the Best of Them


King, Francis, The Spectator


Right up with the best of them

THE BOY WHO TAUGHT THE BEEKEEPER TO READ by Susan Hill Chatlo, L10.99, pp. 216 ISBN 0701175966

This collection of nine stories, less than 50,000 words in length, is light in the hand. It is, however, a work of impressive substance. Immediately before I embarked on it, I had been reading for review a novel so immense that I felt like a vet asked to give an elephant a thorough check-up. In contrast Hill can evoke a setting, convey the essence of a situation and let one see into the inmost hearts of her characters in a paragraph or even a single sentence.

She is particularly skilful in her depiction of relationships between young and old. One of the best of the stories, 'Father, Father', a novel in miniature, begins with two sisters, both working but still living at home, who become the appalled observers of the anguish of their father, a man in his seventies, by their mother's death-bed. For months after their mother's death, they cannot rouse him from the numb torpor of his grief. Then, on returning from work, they hear voices from the garden. Their father is not alone. Eventually, he marries the much younger woman to whom he has been talking, and, inexorable step by step, father and second wife not merely efface all memory of the dead woman but also drive the two daughters out of the house.

In the title story, the old-young relationship is between an adolescent boy and the family handyman whom he begins to teach to read. Within a few months, the boy has terminated the friendship with the same capricious abruptness with which he started it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Right Up with the Best of Them
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.