Tables for Two: The Four Horsemen

By Lester; Amelia | The New Yorker, July 6, 2015 | Go to article overview

Tables for Two: The Four Horsemen


Lester, Amelia, The New Yorker


TABLES FOR TWO

THE FOUR HORSEMEN

Open daily for dinner. Plates $13-$20.

295 Grand St., Brooklyn (718-599-4900)

"If I could see all my friends tonight," James Murphy sang once, or rather, many times, at the end of the biggest song on LCD Soundsystem's biggest album. Eight years after that album, and four years after the band played its farewell shows at Madison Square Garden, Murphy has willed his wish into being, with a captivating wine bar in Williamsburg. He can be seen there frequently, with his wife, Christina Topsoe, who is also a partner in the restaurant, and a fluid circle of drinking companions.

The atmosphere alone could be enough to warrant a visit: a burlap-walled, cedar-accented party hosted by a low-key, affable celebrity. "We're music writers," offered a pair in contrasting flannel shirts, who explained one recent evening that they'd travelled across town to catch a glimpse of Murphy. Once he'd been spotted, a glass of marmalade-colored Languedoc in hand, the music writers made quick work of a plate of prosciutto and calculated an intricate split of their bill. A food writer, though, was also gratified, by the garlicky jolt of the aioli on patatas bravas; steak tartare in puddles of buttermilk; a pork shank with shelling beans made summery with strands of zucchini and dollops of salsa verde. …

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