Being Protestant in Reformation Britain

By LeTourneau, Mark S. | Anglican and Episcopal History, June 2015 | Go to article overview

Being Protestant in Reformation Britain


LeTourneau, Mark S., Anglican and Episcopal History


Being Protestant in Reformation Britain. By Alec Ryrie. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, Pp. xiii, 498. $65.00.)

This book asks two main questions: "What did early modern Protestants do in order to live out their religion; and what meaning did they find in those actions" (2)? The answers substantiate the thesis that "devotional life shows us early modern British Protestantism as an intense, dynamic, and broad-based religious culture" (3). As the thesis indicates, Ryrie analyzes that culture through the lens of "devotion rather than doctrine" (2), relying on both published sources such as sermons and devotional guides and unpublished ones like diaries, journals, memoirs, and commonplace books (10). He has mined this rich vein thoroughly; the list of primary sources in the bibliography is far longer than the list of secondary sources. Reformed Protestant piety is evaluated as to its emotional life (chapters 1-5), theory and practice of prayer (6-10), reverence for scripture (11-12), corporate devotion (13-14), and life narrative (15-16). What emerges is a fine-grained depiction of pious practices, in England and Scodand, for the period 1530-1640, before the disruption effected by the Civil War.

Of the three parts of his thesis, the best defended is the third. Ryrie argues convincingly that despite their doctrinal differences, conformists and puritans shared a common devotional milieu, which included fasting before communion, observing holy days besides the Sabbath, and valuing, besides the Lord's Prayer, both public and private prayer, extempore and written (104, 471). (These puritan-conformist convergences make it regrettable that Ryrie scants Hooker as "distinct" [6].) The intensity and dynamism of early modern Protestant piety are not to be denied, and each is nicely captured by wrestling as metaphor for both prayer and fasting (251-52). However, they are harder to distinguish from each another, and the rhythm of religious observances and of efforts to maintain one's initial zeal (412-13) must qualify the claim that the dynamism of Protestant piety "deplored rhythms" (4). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Being Protestant in Reformation Britain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.