Daughters of the Anglican Clergy: Religion, Gender and Identity in Victorian England

By Kujawa-Holbrook, Sheryl A. | Anglican and Episcopal History, June 2015 | Go to article overview

Daughters of the Anglican Clergy: Religion, Gender and Identity in Victorian England


Kujawa-Holbrook, Sheryl A., Anglican and Episcopal History


Daughters of the Anglican Clergy: Religion, Gender and Identity in Victorian England, By Midori Yamaguchi. (Houndsmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave MacMillan, 2014, Pp. xiii 4- 324. £ 68.00.)

Midori Yamaguchi, in Daughters of the Anglican Clergy: Religion, Gender and Identity in Victorian England, reconstructs the ecclesiastical life and culture of a group of nineteenth-century women who shared fathers in the same occupation-parish clergy- and investigates how a vicarage upbringing influenced their vocational choices. This far-reaching study illustrates how clergy daughters were linked with many of the major reform movements of Victorian England, including the birth of feminism, women's educational reform, the growth of charitable organizations, and the strategies of the Church of England. Yamaguchi's thesis contends that for clergy daughters, their father's occupation had an immense impact on the construction of their identities. Though few were satisfied with the education they received in the parsonage, clergy daughters were nonetheless highly visible in the religious, cultural, and political matrix of Victorian England, and were highly influential in regards to the church's view of women. Moreover, Yamaguchi argues that the period's evangelical fervor, along with a series of crises-threats of disestablishment, the spread of nonconformist sects, agricultural depression, and widespread religious doubt-changed the role of clergy families and the nature of the ministry itself. As the church began to enforce rules making it necessary for clergy families to live within the parish, their role as paragons of middle-class virtue became more prominent. For daughters, often in the absence of brothers sent away for schooling, their role within the family grew to include ministering to the poor and the sick, teaching religious education, and other charitable works. A feminized parsonage was the result of the national and global networks which resulted from the growing numbers of women from parishes knitted together through voluntary acts of charity.

Yamaguchi, a professor at Daito Bunka University in Japan, presents this study of clergy daughters as an exercise in "collective biography" in the belief that such studies of children of persons in particular professions can yield new insight into historical analysis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Daughters of the Anglican Clergy: Religion, Gender and Identity in Victorian England
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.