Beyond the Mafia: Italian Americans and the Development of Las Vegas

By Duncan, Joyce | Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), Spring 1998 | Go to article overview

Beyond the Mafia: Italian Americans and the Development of Las Vegas


Duncan, Joyce, Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA)


Beyond the Mafia: Italian Americans and the Development of Las Vegas. Alan Balboni. Reno, NV: University of Nevada Press, 1996. $27.95 cloth.

In the wake of such published and filmed blockbusters of modified history as Bugsy and Nicholas Pileggi's Casino comes Beyond the Mafia by Alan Balboni, professor of history and political science at the Community College of Southern Nevada in Las Vegas. The world's population has long been fascinated by the romance of Glitter Gulch and The Strip and lured by the promise of quick riches, easily attained, but it has been the mythological marriage of that adult Disneyland to the Mob which has most intrigued those attracted to Nevada lore. Although he acknowledges the historical presence of "The Boys," as he calls those connected to organized crime, Dr. Balboni offers an antithesis to popular opinion by proving that many immigrants, particularly those of Italian descent, were instrumental in all areas of the economic development of Las Vegas, without any fraternization with the Mafia.

According to Balboni, the national media's focus on alleged Mob connections to organized gambling and to the unprecedented growth of Las Vegas (from 127,000 in 1960 to over a million in 1995) has downplayed the diverse and important contributions made by the average entrepreneurial immigrant spirit. Based on interviews with more than 150 Italian American residents of Las Vegas, Beyond the Mafia endeavors to dispel the Mafia myth by revealing individual life stories of real people descended from agrarian stock, railroad builders, shopkeepers, politicians, restauranteurs, and public works officials as well as those employed by the casinos. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Beyond the Mafia: Italian Americans and the Development of Las Vegas
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.