A Western Convergence

By Kolpas, Norman | Southwest Art, August 2015 | Go to article overview

A Western Convergence


Kolpas, Norman, Southwest Art


Trailside Galleries, August 1-30

AUGUST IS historically the busiest month for tourism in Jackson, WY, and nearby Yellowstone National Park. So Trailside Galleries, one of the city's most venerable purveyors of western art, expects a big turnout of collectors and aficionados for the August 20 celebration of its monthlong show entitled A Western Convergence.

The title itself might seem to suggest an episode from some classic cowboy serial, and that would.n't be too far off the mark. In fact, says Trailside managing partner Maryvonne Leshe, the name aims to convey multiple meanings. "It refers to the convergence of cultures that took place here in Jackson," she says of the Indian tribes, explorers, mountain men, trappers, and cowboys who passed through the area, all following the geologic convergence of the Teton and Gros Ventre ranges and the Snake and Gros Ventre rivers. "Each influence brought something different to Jackson," Leshe continues, explaining the cultural vitality that to this day makes the place so dynamic.

So it seemed highly fitting for Trailside to invite five distinctive and distinguished painters in various western genres to converge here, each bringing with him at least five new works. Bill Anton, known for his atmospheric yet detailed depictions of authentic ranching life, is participating. So is Jim C. Norton, who captures both historical and present-day scenes of Native Americans in a traditional style, and Logan Maxwell Hagege, who has gained acclaim for his graphic depictions of modern southwestern tribes. …

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