Meet AGA's Next National President

The Journal of Government Financial Management, Summer 2015 | Go to article overview

Meet AGA's Next National President


John E. Homan, MBA, CGFM, CPA, CGMA

AGA's National President-Elect, John E. Homan, is a senior manager with CliftonLarsonAllen LLP, where he focuses on large-scale audit and advisory engagements.

During his public accounting career of more than 18 years, he has audited and consulted for CFO Act agencies, state and local governments, independent agencies, Fortune 500 firms and major regulators.

John currently serves as Vice Chair of AGA's National Executive Committee (NEC), and previously served as Senior Vice President (SVP) at Large, Regional Vice President (RVP) for the Capital Region and President of the Northern Virginia Chapter. He received the National Platinum RVP award and guided the Northern Virginia Chapter to platinum recognition.

He is a graduate of Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and Columbia Business School. John is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), the Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants, and the American Society of Military Comptrollers.

He has been published in the Journal of Government Financial Management and the California Management Review.

Please share how AGA membership has affected your professional life.

Profoundly: in my "day job," I audit and consultfor majorfederal agencies, and state and local governments, with the goal of leading my teams to provide value-added service. To provide that value, one has to have the latest information, and be up-to-date on the best practices and approaches to problems and issues. AGA is the place for public and private sector government finance professionals to congregate, collaborate and exchange ideas. Through AGA, I've learned - from the highest-level decision-makers - nuances of such issues as federal fiscal sustainability, cybersecurity, shared services and intergovernmental financial risk. Serving as a Certificate of Excellence in Accountability Reporting reviewer provided me knowledge and perspective I am able to leverage. AGA helps me bring the best ideas to my clients and enables me to effectively meettheir accountability objectives.

What do you see as AGA's greatest challenge and where do you think AGA can and should impact?

AGA's greatest challenge will be having sufficient resources to remain atthe forefront of knowledge in the financial management profession. Overthe past 10 years, AGA has transformed itself into an education, certification and research powerhouse. Everything we do - such as having the preeminent professional developmenttraining events in governmentfinance, publishing one of the leading professional journals, offering 100,000 hours of continuing professional education and supporting a network of 100 chapters that offers first-rate programs - requires resources. Sustaining and expanding in an environment of fiscal austerity is not easy. AGA is the only organization that unites federal, state and local governments; and with that mission comes a responsibility to keep our programs funded and growing. We need to focus on expanding all revenue streams.

Where do you plan to put the most emphasis in the coming year?

My presidential theme is "Celebrating the Government Workforce." My goal is to enhance communication about successes and advances in the public sector, despite current challenges. I plan to share stories of cuttingedge government practices such as highlighting the federal government's use of analytics to identify and prevent fraud and improper payments, and the movement to shared services to reduce cost through standardization.

I also plan to address critical gaps in government accounting education. Research from AGA's education taskforce shows 36 percent of universities within the Association of Collegiate Schools of Business do not offer a government accounting course. Thus, graduating accounting students are not equipped with the knowledge to address problems like the fiscal sustainability of programs such as social security and Medicare. …

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