Native and Spanish New Worlds: Sixteenth-Century Entradas in the American Southwest and Southeast

By Baugh, Timothy G. | Southeastern Archaeology, August 2015 | Go to article overview

Native and Spanish New Worlds: Sixteenth-Century Entradas in the American Southwest and Southeast


Baugh, Timothy G., Southeastern Archaeology


NATIVE AND SPANISH NEW WORLDS: SIXTEENTH-CENTURY ENTRADAS IN THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST, Clay Mathers, Jeffrey M. Mitchem and Charles M. Haecker. Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 2013, 382 pp., app., notes. $50.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-8165-3020-5; $35.00 (paper), ISBN 978-0-8165-3122-6

In the "Editors' Preface," Clay Mathers and Jeffrey Mitchem explain that this volume owes its genesis to a variety of venues, including the Albuquerque meetings of the Society for Historical Archaeology in 2009; the Atlanta meetings of the Society for American Archaeology, in 2009; and a weeklong seminar at the Amerind Foundation, also in 2009. The editors organized the volume to cut across the artificial geographical barriers established by our discipline, but not by the indigenous people of North America. As a result, this book provides meaningful insight into the peoples of two culture areas within the southern United States.

The first chapter, "Entradas in Context," is an overview by Mathers and Mitchem. This is followed by eight sections in this volume and (with the exception of the first and fifth sections) all have paired chapters. The six sections include: Native Perspectives, Historiography, Climate, Disease, Conflict, and the concluding Discussion.

The first section, entitled "Native Perspectives," provides only one view that of being Zuni in western New Mexico. This southwestern perception starts off a little slow, but less than half-way through the chapter, I was thoroughly engaged by the writing of Kurt Dongoske and Cindy Dongoske, who note that Vásquez de Coronado arrived at Zuni during an important religious ceremony. The "Knight of Spain" was insulted by the lack of attention he felt he was owed, and the Spaniards did not attempt to understand the concerns of the Zuni people. As a result, conflict erupted in which a number of Indigenous warriors died. This section was well worth reading but unfortunately, there is no Southeastern perspective on first encounters.

Section II provides a "Historiography" using two chapters. The first is on the Vásquez de Coronado expedition in "Catch as Catch Can" (Richard Flint and Shirley Flint). The chapter provides valuable information for understanding the background of an entrada, including its composition, needed skills, multiplicity of cultures, as well as the men and women who composed such an impetuous band. Such information establishes a baseline for understanding the interactions between the entradas and their reluctant hosts. The second chapter, entitled "Contact Era Studies and the Southeastern Indian" by Robbie Ethridge, discusses the development of ethnohistory, the relation between history and anthropology, and the need for a synthesis of Indigenous culture and history

Section ID deals with "Climatic Influences and Impacts" by examining our current knowledge of the environment in the Southwest and its impact on Hispanic and Indigenous interactions in the Middle Rio Grande basin (Carla Van West, Thomas Windes, Frances Levine, Henri GrissinoMayer, and Matthew Salzer). This approach offers a fresh perspective on the religious conflict between two cultures during a major drought culminating in the "hanging of Pueblo leaders in 1675" C. E. (p. 98). Dennis Blanton examines La Florida in the sixteenth century. He notes cultural responses to drought differ between societies based upon their cultural complexity and knowledge of the environment. In other words, Indigenous societies experienced less drastic stress than members of the colonial European occupation-a finding supported by archaeological disaster studies in general.

Section IV examines the impact of introduced diseases. Both the Southwest chapter (Ann Ramenofsky and Jeremy Kulisheck) and the Southeast chapter (Dale Hutchinson) conclude that the impact of infectious microbes is less than once believed by scholars. Ramenofsky and Kulisheck state "warfare, exploitation, and disease were the common variables that shaped the colonial encounter, understanding how these variables operated singly or in combination must be investigated on a case-by-case basis" (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Native and Spanish New Worlds: Sixteenth-Century Entradas in the American Southwest and Southeast
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.