Validity and Reliability of Comprehensive Assessment Instruments for Handball and Badminton Games in Physical Education

By Salimin, Norkhalid; Jani, Julismah et al. | Asian Social Science, October 2015 | Go to article overview

Validity and Reliability of Comprehensive Assessment Instruments for Handball and Badminton Games in Physical Education


Salimin, Norkhalid, Jani, Julismah, Shahril, Mohd Izwan, Elumalai, Gunathevan, Asian Social Science


Abstract

This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Comprehensive Assessment instruments for handball and badminton games in physical education. This study conducted by six types of instruments in comprehensive assessment, that are handball cognitive assessment, handball psychomotor assessment, handball affective assessment, badminton cognitive assessment, badminton psychomotor assessment and badminton affective assessment. The measuring instruments of this study are built based on the level of Bloom's taxonomy (1956) for cognitive domain, taxonomy Dave (1970), taxonomy for psychomotor domain and taxonomy Krathwohl et al. (1964) for affective domain. The results showed the validity of a comprehensive assessment for handball was r = .82 and r = .80 for badminton. While the reliability of handball cognitive assessment r = .78 (n = 36), handball psychomotor assessment r = .93 (n = 31), handball affective assessment r = .83 (n = 39), badminton cognitive assessment r = .75 (n = 40), badminton psychomotor assessment r = .81 (n = 40), badminton affective assessment r = .81 (n = 40). The percentage of agreement between examiners (inter observer agreement) for handball is (70.11 %, SD = 0.57) and badminton (70.03 %, SD = 0.68). Based on the findings, this comprehensive assessment is suitable to be used as a standard instrument to assess students' achievement in handball and badminton games through Physical Education subject in School Based Assessment.

Keywords: physical education, assessment, badminton, handball, validity, reliability

1. Introduction

Physical Education (PE) is a core and compulsory subject to be taught in the Integrated Curriculum for Secondary School based on Education Act 1996, through the Professional Circular Number 25/1998 (Ministry of Education Malaysia, 1998). Physical Education plays a very significant role in contributing to the comprehensive growth and development of students via the learning experiences based on cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains (Darst & Pangrazi, 2006; Abdullah Sani, 2003; Freeman, 2001; Daeur & Pangrazi, 1995). In order to determine the achievement of learning, a form of measurement and evaluation should be carried out during the teaching process.

Teachers are required to conduct an assessment to determine the achievement of goals and objectives of PE subject. According to Bhasah (2007), evaluations are designed to assess the status of an evaluated object and to compare the status with respect to a set of standard or criteria for decision making. In this context, evaluation is a process that includes objective determining, information gathering, information processing and conclusion forming. When all these processes are conducted systematically and scientifically, the decision will be more accurate and will meet the purpose of evaluation results (Abu Bakar & Bhasah, 2008).

Since 1989, formal summative assessment in Integrated Curriculum for Secondary School (ICSS) had been introduced for PE subject and for the first time PE marks and grades are included in the students' report cards based on the assessment results. The assessment consists of two parts, that are examination methods and National Physical Fitness Standard (SEGAK) test based on Professional Circular No. 4/2008, Ministry of Education, Malaysia (2008). This assessment is actually not complete because students are only assessed by means of the examinations (cognitive domain) and SEGAK test (psychomotor domain) which focus on the fitness aspect only.

Therefore, PE subject evaluation implemented now is considered not complete and holistic, not balanced and comprehensive due to the lack of standardized instruments and standards to be adopted by teachers to assess students in PE, especially concern to game skills. Teachers should use a standard assessment process for effective assessment. This study recommends an effective comprehensive assessment which includes a thorough assessment of cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains of learning. …

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