Bilingualism and Bilingual Deaf Education

By Müller de Quadros, Ronice | Sign Language Studies, Fall 2015 | Go to article overview

Bilingualism and Bilingual Deaf Education


Müller de Quadros, Ronice, Sign Language Studies


Bilingualism and Bilingual Deaf Education, edited by Marc Marschark, Gladys Tang, and Harry Knoors (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014, 495 pp., hardcover, ISBN 978-0-19-937181-5)

THIS BOOK DISCUSSES aspects of bilingualism and bilingual education that directly or indirectly affect deaf education. It offers an overview of research on deaf education that shows evidence of bilingualism among deaf children, focusing on their acquisition of language and bimodal and bilingual processing. The editors state that not enough research has been done on effective education for deaf people and on whether bilingual education could endorse Deaf education.

Interestingly, in the book the word "deaf" is written with a small d, not with a capital D, already placing it in a position that does not assume a Deaf perspective on education. Instead, this usage of lowercase "deaf" indicates that the book is an aggregation of research that includes studies that use D and others that use d.The book seems to be more general in that it reflects several views of the work produced up to now that does not put forward a consensus view of deaf education.

The volume is organized in three parts: (1) a general discussion of Deaf bilingualism; (2) a focused discussion of Deaf educational issues; and (3) a more specific analysis of the bilingual setting in coenrollment environments experienced by deaf children. Each of these three parts includes works by several authors.

Part one considers various perspectives on Deaf bilingualism, especially with respect to linguistics, language issues (including bilingual acquisition and bimodal bilingualism), psychosocial development, the relationship between reading and sign language, and signed and spoken language development.The findings presented here indicate that Deaf people leverage interconnected language systems and learn how to use them in forms appropriate for their interlocutors and the relevant communication purposes of any given context. Several of the authors mentioned in this section state that it is crucial to guarantee bimodal/ bilingual development for deaf children inasmuch as language development depends on signed and spoken language access, which will enable children to build self-identity and acquire cultural, linguistic, and cognitive skills. Cross-language interaction and coactivation are also considered, together with the effects of bilingualism on cognitive control and the consequent implications for Deaf education. Also in this first part, several authors discuss the effects of a neurolinguistic perspective, such as the possibility of producing both languages at the same time in code-blending examples from early sign language users, indicating the impact of age on neural systems. These chapters present basic research studies on the characteristics of a bilingual Deaf person.

For educational purposes, a number of authors in this first section state that, although the acquisition of sign language seems to be crucial, we still have much to learn about how to design bimodal/ bilingual educational curricula. Several chapters are devoted to deaf childrens reading development.Their authors present research findings that suggest that sign language may have a positive correlation with reading comprehension, but they also present other studies with contradictory results. For children with cochlear implants, research is presented that supports the use of a spoken language with signs cooccurring with speech as the preferred educational approach (rather than a bilingual education model).This controversy about the role of sign language again points out the inconsistency between the chapters regarding the Deaf point of view. Other research in this section presents a perspective of "difference," not "deficiency," claiming that language plays an important role in Deaf people s lives since they have unique linguistic-communicative experiences at home, at school, and in their general social lives. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bilingualism and Bilingual Deaf Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.