From the Director

By Richter, Daniel K. | Early American Studies, Fall 2015 | Go to article overview

From the Director


Richter, Daniel K., Early American Studies


It is my sad duty as Director of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies to inform our readers that C. Dallett Hemphill passed away on 3 July 2015, on the third day of her second term as editor of Early American Studies.

The end came unexpectedly but followed a long battle with breast cancer and its complications. It is emblematic of Dallett's character that-while she made no secret of her condition-just her family and a few close colleagues were aware of her struggle. This made her sudden death all the more shocking to those who knew only her relentless positivity as a teacher, scholar, editor, citizen, mentor, and friend. She inspired generations of students at Ursinus College, where she taught for twenty-eight years. She published two major monographs with Oxford University Press, Bowing to Necessities: A History of Manners in America, 1620-1860 (1999); and Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History (2011). She was a bedrock of the McNeil Center community, as a former Advisory Council Chair, as an architect of the Center's Consortium, and as an indispensable participant in seminars. During her toobrief time at the helm of this journal, she presided over its transition to a quarterly publication, inaugurated ''Class Acts,'' a new department devoted to teaching, introduced enhanced online content, and managed everything with tact and creativity. …

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