Insuring Quality: How to Improve Quality, Compliance, Customer Service, and Ethics in the Insurance Industry

By Ferguson, William L. | Journal of Risk and Insurance, September 1998 | Go to article overview

Insuring Quality: How to Improve Quality, Compliance, Customer Service, and Ethics in the Insurance Industry


Ferguson, William L., Journal of Risk and Insurance


Insuring Quality: How to Improve Quality, Compliance, Customer Service, and Ethics in the Insurance Industry, by Hedy Abromovitz and Les Abromovitz (CRC/St. Lucie Press, 1998).

Reviewer: William L. Ferguson, The University of Southwestern Louisiana.

Insuring Quality: How to Improve Quality, Compliance, Customer Service, and Ethics in the Insurance Industry is the product of an experienced wife and husband writing team. She, a veteran of many years in Total Quality and Quality Assurance functions in various industries; and he, an attorney who served two years as an insurance regulator and fifteen with a major carrier. The pedigree promised much, but delivered somewhat less than expected.

Indeed, the book is a very easy read, at about the high school or junior college level, which may be rather appropriate given the stated target audience of industry employees "in the trenches." Amusing anecdotes, movie plots, tales from popular media sources and jokes, plus some real-life horror stories are found throughout the text. References to Scott Adams' Dilbert and the humor of Jerry Seinfeld, David Letterman and Woody Allen, among other comedic sources, abound.

The 200-page book is structured as a series of fifty chapter-vignettes where all, save the last, end with an Aesopian "Q-Tips." As in a fable, the typical "Q-Tips" offer obviously valuable generalized tidbits, insights and rather common sense solutions to most issues highlighted in the vignette. Though a few specifics on integrating these insights are provided, readers who lack "big picture" decisionmaking influence or authority may find much of the advice and suggestions difficult or impossible to implement. Of course, the primary purpose of the text is not to provide any systematic method of implementation, but merely to advise, enlighten and sensitize readers to potential issues and problem areas. …

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