Exploring Internet Marketing in College Sport: A Content Analysis of College Athletics Websites in the United States

By Yoh, Taeho; Crouch, Matt | Journal of Contemporary Athletics, October 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Exploring Internet Marketing in College Sport: A Content Analysis of College Athletics Websites in the United States


Yoh, Taeho, Crouch, Matt, Journal of Contemporary Athletics


INTRODUCTION

Due to the numerous benefits, sports industry was one of the industries using the Internet as an interactive marketing tool since the creation of the Internet (Brown, 2003; Filo and Funk, 2005; Kahle and Meeske, 1999; Shank, 2009). From the days of being a supplementary tool for the media, sports websites have grown to a media and marketing giant. Some of the earliest literature on the use of the Internet in sport dates back only barely more than 20 years (Shank, 2009). This rapid growth has been in response to the sports fans' need for information on their favorite team or teams. Because of the similarities that exist between the typical Internet user and the typical sports fan, this rapid growth has happened much faster in the sports industry than in others (Brown, 2003). Sport websites offer many interactive experiences from listening to live audio broadcasts, live video broadcasts, photo galleries, and editorial content from game recaps to player features (Filo and Funk, 2005; Carlson, Rosenberger and Muthaly, 2003).

According to Nielsen's Netratings (2007) for February, 2007 found that Americans averaged more than an hour per day in front of their personal computers and viewed more than 1,500 web pages per month. Some sport websites, such as Nascar.com and ESPN have over 1.5 billion page views and average 2.7 million unique users (Shank, 2009). Having such a captive and interested audience is a dream for sports marketers and explains why the sports industry has remained ahead of the curve when it comes to exploiting new Internet technology in reaching its target market. With this in mind, Brown (2003) surveyed 328 sports organizations in the amount of user activity that came through on their websites. The sites averaged 280,652 hits per week with an average of 1,086 repeat visitors per week. His study also noted an average of 62 purchases through the Website per week with the high end of the sample reaching 800 purchases per week.

SPORT WEBSITES AS A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

With sport websites growing more sophisticated as time has past, research has shown that teams and leagues to not just use the website as an information tool, but to also gain marketing advantage (Brown, 2003; Filo and Funk, 2005). Specifically, Brown (2003) stated that many sport organizations use the website to accomplish organizational goals, such providing information about the organization, creating awareness, projecting a favorable image, establishing an interactive channel of communication, gaining access to previously inaccessible customers, providing an opportunity for feedback from the consumers, and selling merchandise and tickets and generating sales leads. Filo and Funk (2005) also noted the importance of the Internet as a marketing tool that because sport fans spend a significant amount of time on sport websites, the opportunity exists for sports teams to strengthen their brand equity among their fans and establish stronger connections.

With sports marketers realizing the potential that exists in reaching an audience through the Internet, several studies have been conducted on the similar demographics of sport and Internet consumers and how traditional marketing strategies can be applied and used on the Internet. Shilbury and Quick (2004) stated that the profiles of typical Internet users and typical sport fans show almost a perfect match. Therefore, Internet is a place where sport marketers and advertisers can really focus on its target market by finding a website that relates to a specific group of people. Delpy and Bosetti (1998) and Shank (2009) found that the greatest advantage of using the Internet as a marketing tool is a good fit between the profiles of Internet users and sports fans. The typical profile of Web users are male ages between 18-34, while the demographics profile of ESPN SportZone is 90% male and 80% of fans fall into the age range 18-34. Both groups reported to have median incomes in the $50,000 range. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Exploring Internet Marketing in College Sport: A Content Analysis of College Athletics Websites in the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.