Archives Update

South Carolina Historical Magazine, October 2014 | Go to article overview

Archives Update


SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, CHARLESTON

Now Available for Research: The following recently processed manuscript collections are now available for research by SCHS patrons at the Addlestone Library, College of Charleston, 205 Calhoun Street. The SCHS welcomes gifts of manuscript collections and publications relating to South Carolina. Such gifts can be designated charitable contributions and are eligible for income-tax deductions. Descriptions of all of the SCHS's processed manuscript collections can be viewed online at http://schistory.org under the "Research" tab. Finding aids for many of the SCHS's manuscript collections can be accessed from the same tab.

Title: Church of the Resurrection records, 1909-2013

SCHS Call Number: 0507.00

Description: 9 linear ft.

Summary: The Church of the Resurrection, a parish of the Episcopal Diocese of Upper South Carolina, was established in Greenwood in 1892. Its first church building, which was consecrated in 1896, burned in 1909. The second church building, which opened two years later, was demolished and replaced by the present edifice, consecrated in 1939.

These records consist of vestry minutes and correspondence, annual parish meeting reports, parish yearbooks, sermons, and parish newsletters as well as records of church organizations (mostly minutes and yearbooks) including the Woman's Auxiliary (later Episcopal Churchwomen), altar guilds, the Brotherhood of Saint Andrew, and the Order of the Daughters of the King. Miscellaneous church records encompass notes and correspondence relating to the archives and history of the parish, stewardship canvass records, centennial celebration records, building committee records, church histories and constitutions, newspaper clippings, church directories, financial records, Foundation Campaign records, rector search records, specifications for a rectory (n.d.), audiovisual material, and a few photographs.

Title: Elizabeth W. A. Pringle family papers, 1858-1981 (bulk 1858-1920)

SCHS Call Number: 0508.00

Description: 0.75 linear ft.

Summary: This collection, given in memory of Charles Albert Petigru Moore, comprises personal papers of Elizabeth W. Allston Pringle (18451921); miscellaneous papers of the related Allston, Moore, and Petigru (or Pettigrew) families; and personal papers of Caroline Petigru Carson (1820-1892). Papers of Elizabeth W. A. Pringle consist of manuscript writings, including her stories "Rab and Dab" and "Their Crystal Wedding"; articles about sheep farming, rice planting, and the colonial records of South Carolina; a story or memoir about family dogs; a play entitled "A Situation Saved"; proof printings of illustrations by Alice R. H. Smith for "A Woman Rice Planter"; a journal of a trip to the 1890 World's Fair in Chicago; a diary (ca. 1860) in French signed "Bessie Allston"; notes and correspondence relating to Pringle's tenure as vice regent of the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association; and miscellaneous items.

Among the family papers are a school scrapbook (Saint Mary's School, Raleigh, N.C.) kept by Charlotte Allston (later Moore, 1872-1935) in the 1890s; a notebook with genealogical and biographical notes on members of the Petigru and Pettigrew families, including James Louis Petigru (1789-1863) and Susan Petigru King (1824-1875); and a "birthday book" containing family births, deaths, and marriages up to 1935.

Papers of Caroline Petigru Carson mostly consist of correspondence and include letters or copies of letters between her and Edward Everett (1794-1865); two letters or copies of letters (1859) to Everett from Lord Macaulay (1800-1859) and his nephew George Trevelyan; letters (1862) to her from her cousin Confederate general James Johnston Pettigrew (1828-1863), then a prisoner of war at Fort Delaware; letters to Louise Gibert North Allston (1833-1896), mainly about Carson's relationship with Everett; letters (1863) from Carson to an unidentified recipient about her efforts to communicate with family members in the South, the death of Pettigrew, and the whereabouts of her son serving in the Confederate army; undated letters (probably 1860s) from Carson in Staatsburg, N. …

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