Attitude of Students towards E-Learning in South-West Nigerian Universities: An Application of Technology Acceptance Model

By Adewole-Odeshi, Egbe | Library Philosophy and Practice, January 2014 | Go to article overview

Attitude of Students towards E-Learning in South-West Nigerian Universities: An Application of Technology Acceptance Model


Adewole-Odeshi, Egbe, Library Philosophy and Practice


INTRODUCTION

Students learning in tertiary institutions all over the world have undergone tremendous transformation, especially since the advent of information and communication technology (ICT) (Bassey et al, 2007).There is a shift from traditional approach of teacher directed to modern methods where computer technology plays a significant role. ICT has promoted learning and made it more meaningful, where students can stay even in their homes or

Classrooms and receive lectures without seeing the lecturer. The aspect of ICT that has brought about this revolution in students' learning is e-learning. (Bassey et al, 2007). Elearning in its broadest sense refers to any learning that is electronically enabled.

In a slightly narrower sense, it is learning that is enabled by the application of digital technologies such as web pages, video

Conference systems and CD-ROMs. Many higher education institutions adopt web-based learning systems for their e-learning courses. However, there is a limited empirical examination of the factors underlying the adoption of web-based learning systems (Abbad, 2009). Successful implementation of a system and adoption by learners requires a solid understanding of user acceptance processes and ways of persuading students to engage

with these technologies (Abbad, 2009). Measuring attitudes has an important role in analyzing consumer behaviour because it is a known fact that there is a strong connection between attitude and behaviour. Specialists have discovered that attitude indicates in a certain degree, the possibility of adopting certain behaviour (Bertea, 2009).

Talking about e-learning, a favourable attitude shows a greater probability that learners will accept the new learning system. Factors such as patience, self-discipline, easiness in using software, good technical skills, abilities regarding time management impact on students attitude towards e-learning. Thus, the attitude can be positive, if the new form of education fits the students' needs and characteristics, or negative if the student cannot adapt to the new system because he does not have the set of characteristics required (Bertea, 2009). Bad elearning perception may be due to lack of understanding, lack of communication, and lack of trust or conflicting agendas in appropriate use of technology. Some goal coaching and awareness exercises are probably needed to strengthen people's perception. It is important to realize that learners are both emotional and intellectual; and emotions have much effect on people's perception and what they do (Ndume, 2008). Technology acceptance is defined as "an individual's" psychological state with regard to his or her voluntary or intended use of a particular technology". Developers and deliverers of e-learning need more understanding of how students perceive and react to elements of e-learning along with how to most effectively apply an e-learning approach to enhance learning (Park, 2009).In addition, knowing students intentions and understanding the factors that influence students belief about e-learning can help academic administrators and managers to create mechanisms for attracting more students to adopt this learning environment (Park, 2009). According to (Olaniyi, 2006), in Nigerian universities such as Obafemi Awolowo university (OAU) and National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN), the commonest type of e-learning adopted is in form of lecture notes on CD-ROM which can be played as at when the learners desire. The challenge of this method is that the number of students per computer in which these facilities are available are un-interactive as compared to when lectures are being received in the classroom. These universities mentioned above adopted the use of intranet facilities; however, this is not well maintained because of incessant poor electricity supply challenge and high cost of running generating set. Most students in Nigeria go to the cyber café but because

there are people of diverse intentions on the net at the same time, and the bandwidth problem, a multimedia interaction cannot be done. …

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