Today in History - Dec. 28

The Canadian Press, December 18, 2015 | Go to article overview

Today in History - Dec. 28


Today in History - Dec. 28

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Today in History for Dec. 28:

On this date:

In 1065, Westminster Abbey was founded by Edward the Confessor.

In 1694, Queen Mary II of England died after more than five years of joint rule with her husband, King William III.

In 1763, brewer-banker-steamship builder-politician John Molson was born in Spalding, England. He died in 1836.

In 1795, plans for building Toronto's Yonge Street were first proposed. The 48-kilometre road, from York (now Toronto) north to Lake Simcoe, was one of the earliest highways in Canada and is still one of the most important roads in Ontario. It was named for Sir George Yonge, then secretary of state for war in the British government. The road was completed in April, 1796.

In 1832, John C. Calhoun became the first vice president of the United States to resign, stepping down over differences with President Andrew Jackson.

In 1841, street lights in Toronto were lit by gas for the first time.

In 1842, Calixa Lavallee, the composer of "O Canada," was born in Vercheres, Lower Canada (now Quebec). The song, with words by Judge A.B. Routhier, was composed for a national convention of French Canadians held in Quebec City in June, 1880. With the exception of "O Canada," Lavallee's work remains largely unknown. He apparently gave little thought to preserving his compositions, more than half of which have been lost or destroyed. Nevertheless, Lavalle is considered one of Canada's musical pioneers. He died in Boston in 1891.

In 1846, Iowa became the 29th state to be admitted to the Union.

In 1859, the first edition of "The Nor'Wester," the first newspaper in the Red River district (now Manitoba), appeared.

In 1869, William Semple of Mount Vernon, Ohio, was granted the first patent for chewing gum.

In 1879, the Tay railway bridge in Scotland collapsed when the Edinburgh to Dundee train was crossing. The engine and carriages plunged into the icy river below, killing 90 people.

In 1895, the first public showing of a movie took place at the Hotel Scribe in Paris.

In 1905, Fanny "Bobbie" Rosenfeld was born in Russia. Rosenfeld was a star for Canada in numerous sports, but is best-known for her track and field accomplishments. At the 1928 Amsterdam Olympics, she won the silver medal in the 100 metres and was the lead runner for Canada's gold medal-winning 400-metre relay team. Rosenfeld was elected to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 1949, one year before she was voted Canada's female athlete of the first half of the 20th century. She died in Toronto in 1969.

In 1908, up to 83,000 people died after Messina, Italy, was levelled by an earthquake. A tidal wave that followed caused more devastation.

In 1923, Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, the French designer and builder of the famous tower, died in Paris. He was born in 1832 in Dijon.

In 1943, the 1st Canadian Division captured the Italian town of Ortona after a week of fierce fighting against German paratroopers during the Second World War. Canadian troops had attacked Ortona, a medieval seaport impregnable from three sides, from the south on Dec. 20. In the fighting, 1,372 Canadians were killed.

In 1944, Maurice Richard became the first player to score eight points in an NHL game. The Rocket had five goals and three assists in the Montreal Canadiens' 9-1 romp over Detroit. Toronto's Darryl Sittler broke Richard's record with 10 points against Boston on Feb. 7, 1976.

In 1945, the U.S. Congress officially recognized the Pledge of Allegiance.

In 1947, Italy's last ruling monarch, Victor Emmanuel III, died in exile in Egypt. …

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