Conversations with American Novelists: The Best Interviews from the Missouri Review and the American Audio Prose Library

By Faktorovich, Anna | Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Fall 2015 | Go to article overview

Conversations with American Novelists: The Best Interviews from the Missouri Review and the American Audio Prose Library


Faktorovich, Anna, Pennsylvania Literary Journal


Kay Bonetti, and others, editors. Conversations with American Novelists: The Best Interviews from The Missouri Review and the American Audio Prose Library. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1997.

This was another interesting title from the University of Missouri Press. I did not notice that it was released back in 1997, but I sensed clues to this as I was reading this book, before I recorded the release date for this review. Jamaica Kincaid is very youthful in her interview from 1991, when she was only forty-two, and already an international celebrity and a classical canonical writer in most literature programs. But, other than a few of these time-stamps, this was an interesting study because it includes in-depth interview questions and replies from authors that are especially relevant to my current work, as I am expanding the interviews section of the Pennsylvania Literary Journal. When I read a book, I penetrate deeper into it if I have a self-interested motivation, as was the case here.

Each of these collected interviews with established American novelists takes on a different shade depending on the novelist being interviewed. When Jamaica Kincaid is in the chair, the questions are primarily biographical and address her race and the parallels between her life and the life of her characters. In contrast, when Robert Stone is being questioned, the interviewer focuses on "form" or the craft of structuring and developing an artificial novel. For example, "The terms 'allegory' and 'morality play' get called up over and over again in reference to your novels. What affinities do you feel with those forms, or, if not the forms, the way of looking at the world which those forms represent?" (13) In both cases, the interviewer closely read several available reviews of these writers' works, but since these reviews stressed different aspects of their unique styles, the interview shifts to meet these.

I read the entire interview with Jamaica Kincaid and it helps to explain where there has been so much press on her across her career. She is spicy and entertaining, and it is a pleasure to look closely at her unique perspective on the life of a writer. For example, when she is asked about her creative process and motivations, she replies: "I started to write out of reasons that were, I thought, peculiar to me-I was lazy and I wasn't really interested in being educated in a way that would suit other people. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Conversations with American Novelists: The Best Interviews from the Missouri Review and the American Audio Prose Library
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.