Effects of Secondary School Students' Perceptions of Mathematics Education Quality on Mathematics Anxiety and Achievement

By Çiftçi, S. Koza | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, December 2015 | Go to article overview

Effects of Secondary School Students' Perceptions of Mathematics Education Quality on Mathematics Anxiety and Achievement


Çiftçi, S. Koza, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


The current aim to create a competitive and knowledge-based economy has led countries to reconsider and structure their education systems. Initiatives in the education system are obliged to focus on and discuss concepts such as the quality of education, effectiveness, accountability and organizational learning (Agasisti, Catalano, & Sibiano, 2013; Carnoy & Loeb, 2002; Chen, Liu, & Lin, 2014; Grygoryev & Karapetrovic, 2005; Karip, 2005; Keeley, 2007; Okoro, 2011; Pashiardis, 2004). In parallel with these discussions, to improve its current international position, Turkey is working to achieve the universal dimensions in the education system and is engaged in various reform initiatives (Atar & Atar, 2012; Çorlu, Capraro, & Capraro, 2014; Çaliçkan, Karabacak, & Meçik, 2013; Çengônül, 2013; Tutkun & Aksoyalp, 2010). Despite these efforts, it is clear that Turkey should take a significant distance to improve the quality of education in terms of international education quality indicators (Akyiiz, 2014; Erberber, 2009; Sezer, Güner, & îspir, 2012; Mullis, Martin, Foy, & Arora, 2012; OECD, 2013).

Effective School and the Concept of Education Quality

The definition of quality in education is similar to the definition of quality in general. Quality is the sum of the characteristics that affect the product or service, which depend on the satisfaction degree of the identified needs (Cheng & Cheung, 2004). Therefore, first generation researchers who first used this concept have defined the concept of quality as excellence in education. Education quality is an appraisal regarding education and includes how learning is organized; how it is managed; what is taught; the level of learning; and the specific educational outcomes achieved (Akyüz, 2014; Erberber, 2009; Sezer, Güner, & îspir, 2012; Mullis, Martin, Foy & Arora, 2012; OECD, 2013). The concept of quality in education has triggered the emergence of effective schools and has opened the way to conduct numerous studies. Lezotte (1991) defined an effective school as a place in which there is a clear mission shared by everyone involved in the school community and there is a dedication to instructional objectives, priorities, assessment processes and accountability. According to Fisher and Cresswell (1988) and Townsend (1997), an effective school is formed by effective leadership, human resource management, a supportive environment, family and students who are motivated to learn. Gamage (2001) emphasized that high expectations exist in effective schools, and there are visible, accessible, and fair stakeholders.

When education quality is looked from a different perspective with efficient school movement, level of achieving the foundation of different dimensions of education draws attentions Education quality in terms of production function of education is the level reaching to desired aims and employment in accordance with the number of students who received diploma or in accordance with the type of received education (Ghabi, 2014; Kenny et al, 2014; Levine & Lezotte, 1990; McLeskey, Waldron, & Redd, 2014). Yet, approach of efficiency, unlike production function approach, focuses on the factors bearing results. Elements of input, process and environment are accepted as common responsibilities of educational outcomes (see Table 1, European Commission, 2000; UNESCO, 2004; Windham, 1988). According to the harmony perspective, the conditions that lead change in education are seen as a tool in improving the quality. Within this frame, educational aims are critically scrutinized. When education quality is looked from a perspective of equal opportunity, the fair distribution of input, process and outcome elements to the beneficiaries of education with different characteristics is taken into consideration. According to the efficiency perspective education quality is defined as obtaining the highest educational outcome with the minimum cost (Lockheed & Levin, 2012; Loeb, Kalogrides, & Béteille, 2012; Osher, Dwyer, Jimerson, & Brown, 2012). …

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