Transformation Leadership Behaviors, Upward Trust, and Satisfaction in Self-Managed Work Teams

By Butler, John K., Jr.; Cantrell, R. Stephen et al. | Organization Development Journal, Spring 1999 | Go to article overview

Transformation Leadership Behaviors, Upward Trust, and Satisfaction in Self-Managed Work Teams


Butler, John K., Jr., Cantrell, R. Stephen, Flick, Randall J., Organization Development Journal


Abstract

This study examined relationships among transformational leadership behaviors, upward trust, and job satisfaction. Data were collected from 78 members of self-directed work teams at a large manufacturing firm in the southeastern U.S. Team members' trust in the leader mediated the relationships between four of six leadership behaviors and team members' satisfaction with their work. All six leadership behaviors moderated the relationship between team members' trust in their leader and satisfaction with their work. However, the data supported neither the mediated nor the moderated model for members' satisfaction with their supervisor.

Introduction

A crucial factor in the success or failure of a work team is the quality of its leadership. Several studies have shown that the effectiveness of a team depends, in part, on behaviors of its leader. For example, Bryman (1992) and Howell and Frost ( 1989) found that charismatic leadership was positively related to satisfaction, effort, performance, and role clarity. Butler and Cantrell (1997) found main and interactive effects of perceived consideration and initiating structure in their prediction of both productivity and satisfaction. Podsakoff, MacKenzie, Moorman, and Fetter ( 1990) demonstrated that transformational leader behaviors influenced employees' trust, satisfaction, and citizenship behaviors.

Podsakoff and his colleagues identified six transformational leadership behaviors (TLBs) associated with a leader's ability to motivate and inspire members (Burns, 1978). They described these behaviors as: articulating a vision for the future, providing an appropriate role model for members, fostering the acceptance of group goals, setting high performance expectations, showing individualized support for members, and providing intellectual stimulation to challenge members and prevent boredom. They argued that these six TLBs motivate members to transcend self-interests and engage in behaviors beyond what they are expected to do (Avolio and Bass, 1988; Yukl, 1989). Podsakoff et al. ( 1990) tested a set of models that specified both trust and satisfaction as mediators between TLBs and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). They found that the TLBs were significantly related to both employees' trust and satisfaction, but were not directly related to the OCBs. Also, trust was related to the OCBs but satisfaction was not.

In a more recent study, Podsakoff, MacKenzie, and Bommer (1996) explored the main and interactive effects of the six TLBs and thirteen substitutes for leadership (Kerr and Jermier, 1978) on a number of criterion variables including employees' trust and job satisfaction. The aggregate set of TLBs explained 28% of the variance in employees' trust in their leader and only 7% of the variance in employees' general satisfaction. These findings, in addition to the fact that trust explained 31% of the variance in general satisfaction suggest that trust might mediate the relationship between TLBs and satisfaction.

In the current study, we extended the work of Podsakoff and his colleagues. Our participants were members of selfmanaged work teams. We chose to study teams because of their current popularity in work organizations. We interviewed 56 managers in our evening MBA courses and in organizations for which we have consulted. These managers indicated that team members' trust in their leader was probably strongly related to team outcomes. However, they stopped short of specifying the nature of these relationships. Therefore, there is still no answer to the question of how trust and leadership behaviors combine as they relate to team outcomes.

Consequently, we proposed and tested two different, though mutually consistent, models of leadership behaviors, trust, and affective outcomes. The first of these models specified trust in the leader as a mediator of the effects of six TLBs on intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction of self-directed work team members. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Transformation Leadership Behaviors, Upward Trust, and Satisfaction in Self-Managed Work Teams
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.