Goldmine British Invasion Record Price Guide

By Cooper, B. Lee | Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), Summer 1998 | Go to article overview

Goldmine British Invasion Record Price Guide


Cooper, B. Lee, Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA)


Goldmine British Invasion Record Price Guide. Compiled by Tim Neely and Dave Thompson. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 1997.

This exceptionally detailed price guide depicts United States and United Kingdom 45 r.p.m. and album releases by British performers who achieved trans-Atlantic recording success between 1956 and 1966. The volume lists more than 11,000 recordings by over 800 artists. The text's alphabetical format (from The Action, Mike and Tim Adam, and The Cliff Adams Orchestra to The Zephyrs, Zero Five, and The Zombies) is supplemented with extensive cross-referencing. Illustrations include black-and-white photos of disc faces and album covers. Broad coverage is provided for The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Animals, The Yardbirds, and The Kinks.

The rather restricted time frame established for this compilation does justice to the ubiquitous Lonnie Donegan ("Rock Island Line") and the short-lived Tornadoes ("Telstar") as pre-1964 U.S. chartmakers. But the arbitrary 1966 termination date creates a historical vacuum in respect to such key U.K. stars as Joe Cocker and Eric Clapton. This is amazingly shortsighted. The "British Invasion" occurred in several waves and continues even today. If Neely and Thompson are intent on lionizing early surges like Chris Barber's Jazz Band and The Alexis Korner Skiffle Group, then they also need to trace later waves made by Led Zeppelin, Cream, Elton John, Fleetwood Mac, Genesis, Peter Frampton, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Pink Floyd, and Queen.

Beyond the issue of identifying post-1966 British singing talent, this price guide would be more valuable and more distinctive if it noted the highly derivative nature of 1956-1966 U.K. group repertoires. For The Beatles and The Rolling Stones in particular, American recordings were models to be imitated. The lyrics, instrumentation, and vocal styles of Arthur Alexander, Little Richard, Carl Perkins, Jimmy Reed, Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, and countless other U. …

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