From the Editor's Desk

By Linker, Timothy L. | Journal of Research Administration, Fall 2015 | Go to article overview

From the Editor's Desk


Linker, Timothy L., Journal of Research Administration


The Journal of Research Administration is dedicated to stimulating critical thought and creating a space for dialogue to answer questions posed to us by our evolving field. As the new Editor of the Journal, I want to thank Dr. Jeffrey N. Joyce, the previous Editor, for his untiring efforts to expand the Journal's breadth and depth of expertise, while working to ensure that it reflects the global community that it serves.

As an outgrowth of those efforts, in October of 2015, the SRA board approved the Journal's transition to an open access and electronic delivery model. This change reflects the Society's efforts to broaden the reach and impact of the Journal and to ensure that it remains the preeminent scholarly publication for research administration. This change also reflects the way in which we engage and consume information.

The Journal's cover art is a reflection of the Society of Research Administrators International's (SRA) 2015 annual conference theme of Learn.Connect.Grow. In this edition of the Journal, you will find articles that speak to a number of pressing concerns in research administration. I encourage you to take a moment and explore the articles and see how they can impact your research endeavors. Canary and authors, in their paper entitled *Disciplinary Difference in Conflict of Interest Policy Communication, Attitudes, and Knowledgeinvestigate how conflict of interest policies are communicated across different disciplines. Dejean, in her article "Syncingthe Law to Resolve the Disconnection between Awareness and Action in Legally Mandated Diversity Hiring Practices in Higher Education Institutions," champions embedding legal compliance within a framework of organizational psychology and therapeutic paradigms. …

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