Research Studies in Higher Education: Educating Multicultural College Students

By Hamilton, Cory; Leon, Raul A. | Journal of International Students, March/April 2015 | Go to article overview

Research Studies in Higher Education: Educating Multicultural College Students


Hamilton, Cory, Leon, Raul A., Journal of International Students


Research Studies in Higher Education: Educating Multicultural College Students

Hicks , T. & Pitre, A. (eds.) (2012). Research Studies in Higher Education: Educating Multicultural College Students. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, Inc.

Research Studies in Higher Education: Educating Multicultural College Students is a collection of nine studies that examine the experiences of under-represented students enrolled in colleges and universities across the US. Presenting both quantitative and qualitative findings, this book enhances our understanding of current topics such as equity, access, achievement, and retention, focusing on the experiences of students. For international students and scholars, this book offers an insight into significant hurdles faced by many multicultural and non-traditional students and recommendations presented to improve college retention and academic success. This book examines the effectiveness of programs and policies intended to assist students of color, first-generation college students, low-income students, undecided students, and non-traditional students.

The first section of the book includes four chapters that examine the experience of African American and Latino students through a qualitative approach. In chapter 1, Vega and Moore provide an assessment of the lived experience of first-generation African-American and Latino college students with elementary and secondary education. The study identifies critical barriers to college access and retention, including a lack of access to knowledge regarding navigating their education, poor educational instruction prior to college, and a lack of familial, peer, and institutional support. The study recommends that secondary school teachers and counselors build a high-expectation atmosphere while providing students and parents specific knowledge about college access.

Chapter 2 proposes a model for cultivating college predisposition. Larde interviewed first-generation African-American college students and identified three key areas that lead to a desire for and successful matriculation into higher education. These factors were self-determination, academic success, and resourcefulness. The author highlights the importance of supportive staff, self-determination based learning, and access to specific information for parents and students about the college application process.

In Chapter 3, Wood and Hilton interviewed African-American male students and examined the topic of academic success in the context of community colleges. In the final chapter of section one, Brown evaluates the perceived influence of racialized discrimination, self-efficacy, and institutional support on the academic success of African American male students at a predominantly White institution.

In the first of three chapters on first-generation college students, Andriano employed a quantitative approach to determine if student engagement affected the likelihood of first-generation students participating in study abroad programs. The study claims that participation in study abroad programs results in academic and psycho-social benefits, and benefits for career clarification and preparation.

In Chapter 6, Rondini focuses on low-income students recognizing their limitations as they adjust to a new environment among students of privilege at an elite university. …

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