Versatile Vine

By Cohoon, Sharon | Sunset, April 1999 | Go to article overview

Versatile Vine


Cohoon, Sharon, Sunset


Whether you train them up a post or let them sprawl, vines are incredibly obliging. Here are four easy ways to grow them

Vines are models of versatility. Once established, they provide privacy and they camouflage, converting unattractive necessities like storage sheds and carports into decorative backdrops. They provide shade, blocking harmful ultraviolet rays from well-used decks all summer. Come winter, when more light is welcome, the deciduous types courteously drop their leaves.

Vines can accentuate an architectural detail by outlining a porch railing, softening a roofline, or curling up a column. They add interest where there is none-greening up the narrow stucco canyons on either side of a tract house, for instance.

Garlanding entryways, vines welcome. Blanketing gazebos in the background, they beckon. Climbing a casual tepee of bamboo poles, vines add drama. Carrying color to the eye and fragrance to the nose, they contribute sensuality

And those are just the ones that grow upward. Dangling through an overhead lath, vines can envelop a patio in green drapery. Trailing downhill, bold vines like bougainvillea turn slopes into riots of color. Vines can grow horizontally too. Delicate ones are particularly good this way. Clematis, for example, can weave through campanula as readily as it can reach for a rose.

In addition, vines are notoriously easy to grow. Most are light feeders, and many are drought-tolerant. Best of all, they require little ground space-just enough soil for their roots and stems. Even the smallest garden can squeeze one in. Isn't there room for a vine in yours?

How to choose a vine

Find suitable locations for vines in your garden before you shop. Are the potential sites sunny or shady? Are there other factors to consider? Boggy ground suitable only for plants that love wet feet, for instance, or lots of reflected light that heat lovers could tolerate? How's the soil? Is the planting area you have in mind under eaves where the vine won't get rain? How will you irrigate-drip, soaker hose, or by hand?

Flowers or foliage or both? Will the vine be a solid backdrop to set off your flowering plants? If so, evergreens like star jasmine or creeping fig are what you want. For shade in the summer and sun in the winter, on the other hand, shop for something deciduous like grape or wisteria. If it's sky-high flowers you're after, when and in what color do you want them?

Clinger or nonclinger? Vines with their own Velcro-like pads, such as Boston ivy, attach themselves to any rough surface without help. But don't grow them next to wood shingles or surfaces you'll repaint often, because clingers don't detach willingly. The majority of vines, however, climb with clasping tendrils or by twining and need three-dimensional support. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Versatile Vine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.