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Ever Since Adam and Eve: The Evolution of Human Sexuality

By Malcolm Potts and Roger Short (Cambridge University Press, 1999; $74.95 cloth; S29.95 paper; illus.) Physician and population expert Potts and reproductive biologist Short have taken an encyclopedic look at human sexual and reproductive behavior. Photographs and pictures (including paintings by such artists as Vermeer, Hogarth, and Rembrandt) illuminate many of the entries.

From Brains to Consciousness? Essays on the New Sciences of the Mind Edited by Steven Rose (Princeton University Press, 1999; $29.95; illus.) Among the questions addressed in this volume by fourteen of the world's leading neuroscientists, psychologists, computer modelers, and philosophers are: Is memory a molecular process? Is schizophrenia a genetic disorder? Can consciousness be computed?

Darwin's Spectre: Evolutionary Biology in the Modern World

By Michael R. Rose (Princeton University Press, 1998; $27.95)

Best known for his experimental work on aging, Rose has written this book for the general reader "curious about evolution and its meaning." In it, he outlines Darwin's main achievements, describes the uses of evolutionary thought in such material realms as agriculture and medicine, and explores various Darwinian approaches to understanding human evolution and the human psyche.

Evolving Brains

By John Morgan Allman (Scientific American Library, 1999; $34.95; illus.)

The evolution and function of the human brain are neurophysiologist Allman's main focus in a well-illustrated edition that includes the latest brain-related findings in both molecular genetics and paleoanthropology.

Mapping the Mind

By Rita Carter (University of California Press, 1998; $29.95; illus.) The recent revolution in medical imaging technology has led to important advances in neurophysiology. With the help of more than 150 illustrations, medical writer Carter charts recent developments in understanding the complex arrangements within the brain that determine behavior and control experience. …

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